Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hopkins study shows older children also benefit from ’lazy eye’ treatment

12.04.2005


Findings challenge age-based treatment guidelines



Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and 48 eye centers across North America report that many children between the ages of 7 and 17 with amblyopia, or "lazy eye," may benefit from treatments usually prescribed for younger children.
"Previously, many eye specialists thought treating amblyopia in older children would be ineffective, but we found that many teenagers responded to treatment," says Michael Repka, M.D., a pediatric ophthalmologist at the Children’s Center and a co-author of the study. "In our opinion, age alone should not determine whether or not to treat." The findings are published in the April issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual loss in childhood, affecting as many as 3 percent of children in the United States. With onset in infancy or childhood, the condition is marked by poor vision in an otherwise healthy eye and occurs because the brain has learned to favor the other eye. Although the amblyopic eye often looks normal, abnormal visual processing limits the development of a portion of the brain responsible for sight. The most common causes are crossed or wandering eyes, farsightedness or nearsightedness.



In the study, 507 children were randomly divided into two groups. One was fitted with new prescription eyeglasses only; the other was fitted with glasses with a plain eye patch or an eye patch with atropine eyedrops covering the healthy eye. Patching was prescribed for periods of two to six hours daily, while the eyedrops were administered daily for children. Children wearing patches or receiving eyedrops were also asked to perform near-vision activities, such as drawing or reading.

In the study, 53 percent of children ages 7 through 12 with glasses, patch treatment and near-vision activity could, after 24 weeks, read at least two more lines on a standard eye chart, which the researchers defined as successful vision improvement. A fourth of children in this age group using glasses alone also met this standard.

For children ages 13 through 17 treated with glasses and eye patches (no drops were given to them), 25 percent experienced vision improvement, compared to 23 percent with glasses only.

Almost half of the children ages 13 to 17 who had not been previously treated for amblyopia improved after being treated with glasses and eye patches, while 20 percent of children treated with glasses alone responded to treatment.

Despite the benefits of treatment, most children - including those who responded to treatment - were left with some visual impairment and did not obtain "20/20" vision. Repka says it is also not known whether vision improvement will be sustained in these children once treatment is discontinued. A follow-up study is planned to determine the percentage of amblyopia that recurs among the children who responded well to treatment.

Kim Hoppe | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.hopkinschildrens.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>