Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hopkins study shows older children also benefit from ’lazy eye’ treatment

12.04.2005


Findings challenge age-based treatment guidelines



Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and 48 eye centers across North America report that many children between the ages of 7 and 17 with amblyopia, or "lazy eye," may benefit from treatments usually prescribed for younger children.
"Previously, many eye specialists thought treating amblyopia in older children would be ineffective, but we found that many teenagers responded to treatment," says Michael Repka, M.D., a pediatric ophthalmologist at the Children’s Center and a co-author of the study. "In our opinion, age alone should not determine whether or not to treat." The findings are published in the April issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual loss in childhood, affecting as many as 3 percent of children in the United States. With onset in infancy or childhood, the condition is marked by poor vision in an otherwise healthy eye and occurs because the brain has learned to favor the other eye. Although the amblyopic eye often looks normal, abnormal visual processing limits the development of a portion of the brain responsible for sight. The most common causes are crossed or wandering eyes, farsightedness or nearsightedness.



In the study, 507 children were randomly divided into two groups. One was fitted with new prescription eyeglasses only; the other was fitted with glasses with a plain eye patch or an eye patch with atropine eyedrops covering the healthy eye. Patching was prescribed for periods of two to six hours daily, while the eyedrops were administered daily for children. Children wearing patches or receiving eyedrops were also asked to perform near-vision activities, such as drawing or reading.

In the study, 53 percent of children ages 7 through 12 with glasses, patch treatment and near-vision activity could, after 24 weeks, read at least two more lines on a standard eye chart, which the researchers defined as successful vision improvement. A fourth of children in this age group using glasses alone also met this standard.

For children ages 13 through 17 treated with glasses and eye patches (no drops were given to them), 25 percent experienced vision improvement, compared to 23 percent with glasses only.

Almost half of the children ages 13 to 17 who had not been previously treated for amblyopia improved after being treated with glasses and eye patches, while 20 percent of children treated with glasses alone responded to treatment.

Despite the benefits of treatment, most children - including those who responded to treatment - were left with some visual impairment and did not obtain "20/20" vision. Repka says it is also not known whether vision improvement will be sustained in these children once treatment is discontinued. A follow-up study is planned to determine the percentage of amblyopia that recurs among the children who responded well to treatment.

Kim Hoppe | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.hopkinschildrens.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Smart Data Transformation – Surfing the Big Wave
02.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Climate change could outpace EPA Lake Champlain protections
18.11.2016 | University of Vermont

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Shape matters when light meets atom

05.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”

05.12.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>