Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Once-daily cystic fibrosis drug offers simpler home treatment and fewer side effects for children

11.02.2005


Nottingham researchers have found a way to treat children with cystic fibrosis (CF), which could reduce their side effects and see more young patients treated at home.



Experts at The University of Nottingham organised the largest successful clinical trial in the UK looking at cystic fibrosis in an attempt to discover whether a common antibiotic used to treat the condition could be administered just once a day instead of the usual three daily doses.

The recommendations from the study, which included CF patients from Nottingham City Hospital and will be published in The Lancet this week, could lead to simpler home treatment with less disruption to patients and their families.


The study was funded with £404,464 from the Cystic Fibrosis Trust, as part of their UK-wide work to improve clinical support for people with cystic fibrosis and help find a cure for this disease.

One of the patients who took part in the study was 17-year-old Kayleigh Boden. Kayleigh, an A-level student from Welton near Lincoln, found that her side effects reduced and she liked being able to administer her drugs just once a day at 4pm rather than the usual three times a day, including a midnight shift.

“The drugs usually lead to tinnitus and headaches and my eyes are affected, but I definitely suffered fewer side effects during the trial,” she added.

Kayleigh hopes that administering her drugs just once a day will help her to effectively manage her condition while allowing her to lead an active life that will include sitting her exams in the summer and, hopefully, achieving her ambition of going to university to train as a quantity surveyor.

Cystic fibrosis is the UK’s most common life-threatening inherited disease. Sufferers have difficulty in digesting food and are vulnerable to chronic chest infections. Every week five babies are born with CF and three people die from the condition — 90 per cent from the lung damage, which often results from chronic chest infections.

Patients are frequently given prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics to treat chronic chest infections, often for two weeks or more. This treatment may be needed every few months and can interfere with children’s schooling or adults studying or getting work. Sometimes intravenous treatment is given at home rather than in hospital to make this easier. However, administering this treatment puts an extra strain on parents, partners or the patient themselves.

In an effort to make home treatment easier, the team in the University’s Division of Respiratory Medicine, led by Professor Alan Knox and Dr Alan Smyth, organised the TOPIC (Tobramycin Once-daily Prescribing In Cystic fibrosis) national trial.

The researchers are based at the study’s co-ordinating centre, Nottingham City Hospital, where they care for 80 children with CF and travel out to see another 80 children at five other hospitals. The hospital also has a busy adult clinic treating more than 100 patients.

The study looked at tobramycin, a commonly-used antibiotic, to see if it would be effective when given once a day rather than the usual three times daily treatment. The drug can potentially lead to reduced kidney function and hearing loss. However, the TOPIC team found that once daily treatment worked just as well and seemed to have fewer side effects in children.

Rosie Barnes, Chief Executive of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust, said: “This is a very encouraging and exciting piece of research not least because of the immediate impact on patients. It will help relieve what is very time-consuming care and reduce the amount of time spent taking the required dose of antibiotics.”

The team is now looking at new ways to help people with CF. Current projects are looking at the role of garlic capsules against chest infection and whether home treatment can be simplified further by giving a second antibiotic as a 24-hour infusion through a small pump device.

Dr Alan Smyth | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>