Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Long-term benefits for newly diagnosed patients with CML receiving first-line therapy with imatinib

06.12.2004


Responses to imatinib found to be durable at 42 months



CHU in Poitiers, France, today announced results of a study showing that newly diagnosed patients with a certain form of leukemia who are treated early with imatinib are more likely to achieve complete cytogenetic responses (the elimination of leukemic cells, a major goal of therapy) and have improved long-term outcomes.

New data from the largest study of CML patients (1106 patients included) ever conducted International Randomized IFN vs. ST1571 (IRIS) study, were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH). In the study, newly diagnosed patients with chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who achieved cytogenetic responses early had improved rates of progression-free survival compared to those who did not achieve early responses. Responses to imatinib were shown to be durable at 42 months.


"The IRIS study continues to show durable responses in patients treated with imatinib," said Pr Francois Guilhot, Head of Oncology Hematology and Cell Therapy Department, CHU La Miletrie, Poitiers, France. "For patients who achieved the highest responses at 12 months, the probability of remaining free of the leukaemia was very high."

Study Details

The landmark analysis showed that at 42 months, 84% of patients taking imatinib remained progression free, and only 6% progressed to the more advanced disease stages (accelerated phase and blast crisis). Overall survival (based on CML-related deaths) in patients treated with imatinib was 97% at 42 months. Patients taking imatinib as first treatment who achieved a complete cytogenetic response (CcyR) within 12 months of therapy had a 93% progression free survival rate at 42 months, compared with 74% in those without CcyR. For patients who had achieved CcyR and a thousand-fold (3 log) or greater reduction in Bcr/Abl transcript level (called a molecular response) at 12 months, the probability of remaining progression free was 98% at 42 months, compared with 90% for patients with CcyR and less than a thousand-fold reduction and 75% for patients who had not achieved CcyR.

In CML, a molecular response is the disappearance or reduction in quantities of Bcr-Abl transcripts, which produce the abnormal protein responsible for driving the proliferation of white blood cells that occurs in CML patients. CHR refers to the normalization of blood counts, lasting for at least four weeks; however, the Ph chromosome positive (Ph+) cells may still be present. In McyR, less than 35% of cells containing the Philadelphia chromosome (the genetic abnormality that characterizes most cases of CML) are detected. In CcyR, Ph+ cells remain.

This study, abstract n°21, was published in Blood, Volume 104, Issue 11, November 16, 2004

About IRIS Study

IRIS: the largest Phase III CML study to date. From June 2000 to January 2001, 1106 patients were enrolled at 117 centers in 16 countries in the IRIS study (553 randomized to each treatment arm). This was the largest and most rapidly accrued phase III CML to date The IRIS study (study 106) protocol allows for a crossover in the case of lack of response, loss of response, or intolerance of treatment. After interim analysis of the trial data, the initial study protocol was amended by the Independent Data Monitoring Board (IDMB) to enable patients in either arm to cross over if no MCR had occurred after 1 year of treatment, instead of 2 years as initially required, and to enable patients in the IFN + ara-C arm to cross over to imatinib at any time, if desired.

Stéphan MARET | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.chu-poitiers.fr

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>