Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

More than 41 million Americans need colorectal cancer screening

01.12.2004


Study shows capacity exists to screen population within one year



More than 41 million Americans who are candidates for colorectal cancer screening have not been screened for this second-leading cancer killer, the first time the unscreened population has been quantified. According to a study published today in the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) journal Gastroenterology, sufficient capacity exists to screen the unscreened population within one year using fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) followed by diagnostic colonoscopy for positive tests.

Guidelines of multiple agencies and professional societies underscore the importance of colorectal cancer screening for all individuals 50 years of age and older. Approved tests include barium enema, FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Each screening option has advantages and disadvantages. "Given the enormous number of people who are eligible for screening but have not been screened, it is clear that regardless of the test, colorectal cancer screening is underutilized," notes Bernard Levin, MD, AGA spokesperson. "Men and women who are otherwise fit should be screened for colorectal polyps and cancer because colorectal cancer can be prevented by polypectomy and cured when detected early."


Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) used data from the U.S. Bureau of the Census and CDC’s National Health Interview Survey to estimate the size of the population that has not received colorectal cancer screening. In addition, a companion paper published in this issue of Gastroenterology reports findings of the CDC’s national Survey of Endoscopic Capacity which estimates the number of flexible sigmoidoscopies and colonoscopies performed in a year, and the maximum number that physicians could perform given an increased demand.

Although ample capacity exists for screening with FOBT, a test that is inexpensive and widely available, findings of this study suggest that capacity limitations exist for flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Limitations may be due, in large part, to the fact that only certain specialists are trained to perform colonoscopies and both tests tend to be more expensive than FOBT. Depending on the proportion of available capacity used for colorectal cancer screening in the United States, it could take up to 10 years to screen the unscreened population using colonoscopy alone, not taking into account the need for repeat screening tests or keeping the currently screened population up-to-date on screening.

"This is the first time that the size of the unscreened population has been measured, then compared to the number of tests being performed, to determine whether the public health community can meet the demand for widespread colorectal cancer screening," said Laura C. Seeff, MD, lead study author with the CDC. "We hope these results will help shape colorectal cancer screening programs that may emerge in ensuing years."

Routine screening tests can detect the large, more dangerous polyps, which can be removed during a colonoscopy. Guidelines published by the U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer in February 2003, recommend patients who have small polyps removed have follow-up or "surveillance" colonoscopies every five years. However, many patients are receiving surveillance colonoscopies more frequently, therefore reducing overall screening capacity. "Shifting colonoscopy resources away from excessive, unnecessary surveillance examinations could increase the available supply of screening colonoscopy," notes Theodore R. Levin, MD, in an editorial accompanying the CDC study. Dr. Levin is the Regional Director of Colorectal Cancer Screening and a gastroenterologist at Kaiser Permanente, Northern California.

Since the study results are based on national data, results may not bear out in smaller geographic areas. Assessments are underway in 15 states to take into account differences in availability of screening methods and to further guide local planning for colorectal cancer screening. "These capacity estimates provide a foundation from which planning for widespread colorectal cancer screening and follow-up at the national and regional levels can occur," said Seeff.

Kimberly Wise | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gastro.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
31.05.2017 | University of Washington

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolution

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New femto-camera with quadrillion fractions of a second resolution

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Rice U. chemists create 3-D printed graphene foam

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>