Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Babies who go out in the afternoon sleep better at night

23.11.2004


Parents are more likely to get a good night’s sleep if they take their babies out in the early afternoon, according to a study in December’s Journal of Sleep Research.



Yvonne Harrison, from the School of Psychology at Liverpool John Moores University, found that babies who sleep well at night are exposed to twice as much light between 12 noon and 4pm than poor sleepers. 56 healthy, full-term babies were monitored for three consecutive days at six, nine and twelve weeks’ old. Parents were supplied with an environmental light monitor attached to a small teddy bear with Velcro fastenings, so that it could be attached to a pram handle or cot or placed near the baby.

They also used a tried and tested baby diary, which recorded activity such as sleep and crying. “The environmental light monitor measured the normal levels of light that babies were exposed to in an average day” says Dr Harrison. “Parents were asked to continue their usual routines on the days monitored and the light readings were then analysed together with the diaries. “One possible explanation for the link between light exposure and sleep is that higher light levels encourage the early development of the biological clock, which regulates a number of bodily functions, including the secretion of melatonin, an important factor in well-balanced sleeping patterns.”


The findings have been welcomed by UK TV presenter and sports commentator Annabel Croft, a Patron of the SPARKS charity, which provided financial support for the research. "This is an extremely valuable piece of research. In many ways it underscores something that lots of mums have always suspected. But it is always good to have scientific support for those maternal instincts” says the former British number one tennis player, who has three children Amber (ten), Charlie (eight) and Lily (six). "I certainly remember that my own babies always seemed to sleep better at night when I’d been able to wheel them off to the park on a nice, bright day.

"Sleep deprivation is a very big issue for many mums. You can become exhausted and depressed through lack of sleep yourself and then quite obsessive about how to try and make sure your baby sleeps better through the night. This can be totally debilitating and a very real health issue for some mothers. "I’d say it’s one of the main talking points when groups of mothers of young babies get together and chat about the ups and downs of caring for your child. Hopefully, this SPARKS funded research project and its findings will help spare more mothers and their babies the very real nightmare of sleep deprivation.”

Dr Harrison’s research also discovered that babies cried twice as much at six weeks than twelve weeks, falling from an average of 40 minutes per day to 20. And a baby who slept well at six weeks was likely to be a good sleeper at nine and 12 weeks. Parents who took part in the research were recruited in a number of ways. These included local press advertising and a presentation at The Baby Show Exhibition at the Birmingham National Exhibition Centre. Babies were only included in the study if they were full-term, healthy and free from medication.

“Sleep deprivation is a big problem for many new parents” concludes Dr Harrison. “This research puts forward one theory that may help babies and parents get a good night’s sleep, which is good news for everyone!”

Shonagh Wilkie | alfa
Further information:
http://www.livjm.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>