Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UO study is first to link histamine receptors to heat stress

10.11.2004


Brett Wong is on a mission to help uncover the mechanism that regulates our ability to withstand heat stress. The goal is to help improve survival rates among those who suffer the most during heat waves: the elderly and people with conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.



The award-winning University of Oregon doctoral degree student’s research is the first to identify histamine receptors as contributing to increased blood flow during heat stress. Skin blood flow is a key factor in compensating for exposure to prolonged heat waves. "These are the same receptors that are involved in seasonal allergies for which people take antihistamines," says Wong, who is the lead author on an article describing his findings in the November issue of the Journal of Physiology. Co-authors are Brad W. Wilkins, research associate, and Christopher Minson, assistant professor of human physiology and co-director of the UO Exercise and Environmental Physiology Laboratories.

Theirs is the first study designed to examine a potential role for histamine receptors in skin blood flow in humans. They tested the H1 and H2 histamine receptors and found that only the H1 receptor was involved in skin blood flow changes. The National Institutes of Health (Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) funded the study. "Many deaths in the Midwest have been associated with an inability to increase skin blood flow and regulate body temperature," Wong says. "If we can understand the basic science behind increasing skin blood flow in healthy young individuals, we’ll be able to help at-risk populations."


Led by Wong, the UO research team outfitted 11 human subjects in water-perfused suits and increased their core body temperature to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit. He threaded four hollow microfibers into the skin on their forearms and used microdialysis to target doses of nitric oxide or two types of antihistamines. Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) was used to monitor changes in skin blood flow during heat stress. "I personally don’t like needles but it’s a very powerful technique to study skin blood flow," says Wong, who knows firsthand what the subjects will experience, having tested the technique on himself.

A water-perfused suit is designed to tightly control skin temperature. The subjects wore a plastic coverall over the water-perfused suit, and the feet were wrapped in towels and plastic bags to minimize heat loss.

Current evidence suggests that sweating and increased skin blood flow (cutaneous active vasodilation) is mediated by the co-release of a neurotransmitter with acetylcholine from cholinergic nerves in the skin. However, the precise mechanism of action, and even the neurotransmitter itself, is unknown.

Earlier this year, Wong’s previous work in this area won the top national award for student research from the American College of Sports Medicine. The prize is given annually to only one student in the United States whose research is considered to be the most outstanding in the country.

Originally from Sierra Madre, Calif., Wong earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Davis. His master’s degree is from the UO, and he expects to complete his doctoral degree in summer 2005. He plans to continue his research and eventually to teach in a university setting.

Melody Ward Leslie | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uoregon.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Smart Data Transformation – Surfing the Big Wave
02.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Climate change could outpace EPA Lake Champlain protections
18.11.2016 | University of Vermont

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

09.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Scientists produce a new roadmap for guiding development & conservation in the Amazon

09.12.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops' exposure to air pollution

09.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>