Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

History of smoking significantly reduces survival in head and neck cancer patients

30.09.2004


A new study shows that a history of smoking affects survival in patients with cancer of the head and neck. Patients who had smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime were three times more likely to have better overall survival, disease-specific survival, and recurrence-free survival compared with patients who had a current or previous history of regular smoking. There are approximately 38,000 new cases of head and neck cancer cases in the U.S. each year, the vast majority of which occur in smokers.



The study, to be published October 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, is the first to compare survival in pairs of head and neck cancer patients who differ in smoking status but are matched for other factors. The study provides a more accurate assessment of the link between smoking status and survival by limiting other factors that could affect observed disease outcome. "These findings support previous studies indicating that molecular differences exist between the tumors of smokers and non-smokers and may actually reflect two separate types of head and neck cancer," said Erich M. Sturgis, MD, MPH, in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and senior author of the study. "Our study suggests that the changes that occur in smokers may lead to a more aggressive form of the disease that results in poorer survival."

Although the relative risk of developing head and neck cancer is three to 12 times higher for smokers than for non-smokers, the impact of smoking on disease outcome is unclear. Past studies have had difficulty measuring the effect of smoking status on survival because non-smokers who develop the disease generally differ demographically than patients with a previous or current history of smoking.


In the current study, researchers used a database of more than 500 patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated head and neck cancer, including 83 non-smokers. Each non-smoker was paired with a smoker with similar age, sex, tumor location, disease stage, lymph node status, and treatment history. Applying these matching criteria yielded 50 pairs of head and neck cancer patients for further study. Several other factors, including alcohol use, additional medical conditions, and cancer-associated symptoms such as weight loss, earache, and difficulty swallowing were not included as matching criteria, but were statistically evaluated to assess their impact on survival.

Researchers found that the risk of death, death due to the disease, and disease recurrence was more than three times higher for people with a history of smoking.

Researchers underscored the importance of aggressively promoting tobacco cessation and moderation of alcohol use, as well as managing disease symptoms and other medical conditions in order to improve the quality of life and survival of people living with head and neck cancer.

Carrie Housman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.asco.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>