Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cancer drug may reduce kidney disease in lupus

08.09.2004


A drug that is already being tested as an anticancer agent, especially in lymphoma, may also reduce the kidney disease that is a result of systemic lupus, according to a researcher at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.



The drug, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid ), inhibited the onset of lupus-related kidney disease in mice with lupus, said Nilamadhab Mishra, M.D., an assistant professor of internal medicine - rheumatology, writing in the Sept. 15 issue of The Journal of Immunology, published online today.

Systemic lupus affects an estimated 1.5 million Americans, mostly women, and about half have kidney damage. In systemic lupus, the normally protective immune system attacks the body’s own organs, damaging kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood or skin. Most people with lupus have achy or swollen joints, frequent fevers and prolonged or extreme fatigue.


Besides preventing kidney disease, SAHA decreased the size of the spleen in the mice and at the same time decreased the production of certain T-cells (a type of white blood cell) that are a key to the autoimmune disorder, when compared to mice with lupus that didn’t get the drug. It also decreased excess protein in the urine in the mice.

"Further studies are needed to delineate the most effective therapeutic regimen," Mishra and seven colleagues reported in the article. They also need to determine "the precise mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory properties of SAHA in lupus."

The mice in the study have a defective gene and spontaneously develop lupus, including lymph node swelling and increased spleen size, said Mishra.

The researchers reported that SAHA caused no adverse effects in the animals at the doses given.

Mishra said he hoped to start a phase I clinical trial of SAHA in lupus patients next year. Phase I studies are primarily concerned with assessing a drug’s safety.

Mishra said it would be a double blind study, in which neither doctor nor patient will know whether they received SAHA or an inert placebo until the end of the study.

The compound is the second that Mishra and his colleagues have tested in mice that may lead to new treatment of systemic lupus. In February 2003 they reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that trichostatin A, or TSA, reduced excess protein in urine, inflammation of the kidneys and spleen weight.

Mishra’s colleagues in the study included Christopher M. Reilly, Ph.D., from Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., Gary S. Gilkeson M.D., of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, and scientists at the University of Miami Medical Center in Miami and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Reilly and Gilkerson were involved in the TSA research as well.

Robert Conn | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wfubmc.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
31.05.2017 | University of Washington

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>