Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Using Telemedicine to Virtually Manage Gestational Diabetes and Reduce Large Birth Weights

08.09.2004


In the first study of its kind, researchers at the Temple University School of Medicine will analyze whether the frequent monitoring and adjustment critical to the management of diabetes during pregnancy can be better accomplished virtually. The ultimate goal is to reduce large birth weights, which can pave the way to later problems such as obesity and diabetes.
Gestational diabetes, which typically occurs toward the end of pregnancy, affects 3 to 5 percent of all women in the United States, and is more common in African-American, Latino, American Indian and Asian Indian populations. To keep blood sugars under control, critical for a healthy pregnancy, frequent monitoring is required so that adjustments to diet and medication can be made promptly.

Can telemedicine, primarily via the Internet, make this process easier and more effective? And, more importantly, can the use of telemedicine in managing gestational diabetes help prevent excessive growth of the fetus? These questions form the crux of a new project led by Carol Homko, R.N., Ph.D., C.D.E., assistant research professor at Temple University School of Medicine, and supported by a project grant from the National Institutes of Health.


Through a randomized trial, one group of women will be monitored the conventional way, a significant part of which involves keeping a log book of blood sugar levels and diet, and one group will be monitored through the phone and the Internet. "When gestational diabetes gets out of control, the health of both mom and baby are threatened. My focus in this project is the major consequence of gestational diabetes-excessive growth of the fetus. Many problems can stem from being a big baby, especially a higher risk of diabetes," said Homko, who hopes to reduce the incidence of big birth weights by 10 percent through telemedicine.

"In previous studies with heart patients, another group requiring constant monitoring, we found that frequent contact via the phone and Internet was not only effective in controlling the disease but also embraced by the patient," explained Homko. "Patients loved being in touch with their physician online. And the physicians were able to react more quickly to signs of trouble-for example, a rise in blood pressure or weight."

For any patient, old or young, sick or healthy, frequent hospital or doctor’s office visits to monitor a medical condition or disease are difficult and time-consuming. "I spend a large part of my day on the phone because of the amount of monitoring and interaction needed with patients. It wouldn’t be practical for my patients to come to the hospital all of the time," said Homko. "My job is to figure out how to adjust medication, insulin and diet, according to their blood sugar levels and other symptoms."

On the website for this project, patients regularly enter their blood sugar levels and insulin doses. Homko monitors the information and e-mails responses. The website will soon have automated messages, such as reminders to patients to send in their numbers, in addition to a section for education. Physicians can go to the site and screen patients’ most recent lab results, ultrasounds, medications, pregnancy history and medical history.

It’s believed that telemedicine will lead to better control of blood sugars and therefore a better pregnancy and birth. Valerie Whiteman, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, is the project co-investigator.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.temple.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>