Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UCI study finds kidney disease treatment also reduces related cardiovascular

03.08.2004


Findings point to possible therapy for chronic symptoms of diabetes

Cardiovascular ailments related to kidney diseases possibly can be avoided by blocking a newly identified enzyme that, in excess amounts, raises blood cholesterol levels and promotes arteriosclerosis, according to a UC Irvine College of Medicine study.

In a study on rats, Dr. Nick Vaziri found that controlling levels of ACAT, an enzyme that plays a critical role in cholesterol processing, improved both kidney function and the liver’s ability to remove cholesterol from the blood. The findings suggest that new drugs that control ACAT activity can potentially provide long-term benefits for people with chronic kidney diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. Study results appeared in the July 27 issue of Circulation.



“We’ve found that controlling the proliferation of this enzyme may help people with kidney disease caused by diabetes and various other conditions,” said Vaziri, a professor of medicine and physiology, and chief of nephrology and hypertension at UCI. “Some 20 million Americans have some form of kidney disease, and with diabetes rates rapidly increasing, research on these ailments has the potential to benefit many people.”

Kidney disease, which is common in people with diabetes, causes excessive leakage of protein into urine, an effect called proteinuria. While this leakage can ultimately lead to kidney failure, proteinuria also promotes a marked increase of ACAT levels, which in turn triggers the dangerously high cholesterol levels that lead to arteriosclerosis. Vaziri had shown in previous studies how proteinuria raises blood cholesterol levels.

In this study, Vaziri gave an ACAT inhibitor to rats with proteinuria. In addition to seeing a dramatic reduction of urine protein in these rats, he found that the inhibitor reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels by half. At the same time, HDL cholesterol, known as “good” cholesterol, increased significantly. In addition, the treatment increased the level of an enzyme called LCAT in the blood of the treated rats with kidney disease.

The increases in HDL and LCAT are vital, Vaziri said, to limiting arteriosclerosis. In a precursor to artery hardening, “foam” cells form in the blood vessel walls by absorbing excess cholesterol from the circulating LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol. LCAT works to free this trapped cholesterol for removal and ultimate disposal into the liver by HDL. The higher LCAT levels made possible by the ACAT inhibitor drug, Vaziri added, can keep vascular buildup of cholesterol and the spread of arteriosclerosis to a minimum.

“These dramatic results show that controlling the excessive ACAT seen in proteinuria has a real impact on the cardiovascular ailments linked with kidney diseases,” Vaziri said. “The next step is to explore the effect of ACAT inhibition on people with kidney ailments to see if an effective treatment can be developed one day.”
Dr. Kaihui Liang of UCI assisted with the study.

About the University of California, Irvine: The University of California, Irvine is a top-ranked public university dedicated to research, scholarship and community. Founded in 1965, UCI is among the fastest-growing University of California campuses, with approximately 24,000 undergraduate and graduate students and about 1,300 faculty members. The third-largest employer in dynamic Orange County, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $3 billion.

Tom Vasich | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uci.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>