Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

$100,000 Grant Funds Further Study of Retinal Cell Transplantation

16.07.2004


The University of Utah’s John A. Moran Eye Center has received a $100,000 grant from the Stephen A. and Elaine Wynn Charitable Foundation to fund continued research into retinal cell transplantation. The research is expected to help set the stage for human clinical trials of treatments for a blinding eye disease known as Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP).



The funding will support the work of Raymond D. Lund, Ph.D., the Calvin S. and Janeal N. Hatch Presidential Endowed Chair and Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Utah. Groundbreaking research published by Lund’s group in 2002 demonstrated that vision could be preserved in rats born with vision loss similar to the human disease Retinitis Pigmentosa by transplanting healthy cells from human biopsies into their eyes.

“Our initial research showed, in essence, that rats who would have been blind without a transplant were able to discriminate patterns as well as rats with normal vision. Our idea to transplant new cells into the eye to sustain and nurture defective cells is a novel approach that has proven successful beyond expectations,” said Lund.


Before attempting this type of research in humans, however, Lund says there are more questions that need to be answered. Specifically, new research funded by the Wynn Foundation will evaluate whether any safety issues emerge, how late in the animal’s life transplantation can be effective, and how to translate the laboratory experience to the clinic.

“Once we’re satisfied that all of our questions are answered we’ll begin planning for limited human clinical trials,” said Lund. He emphasizes that the trials will include a very small number of RP patients.

According to the Foundation Fighting Blindness (www.blindness.org), patients with RP often experience a ring of vision loss in their mid-periphery with small islands of vision in their very far periphery. Other patients report the sensation of tunnel vision, as though they see the world through a straw. Many RP patients retain a small degree of central vision throughout their life.

Since the opening of the John A. Moran Eye Center in 1993, the Stephen A. and Elaine Wynn Charitable Foundation has provided the center with nearly $500,000 in funding through grants. The Wynn family has also played an important role in fundraising for the center and Mr. Wynn sits on the center’s Advisory Board.

“The goal of the foundation is to provide seed money to scientists and programs whose research is nearing human clinical trials. We’ve been especially impressed with Dr. Lund and his team of scientists because of the great sensitivity they’ve shown to patients suffering from blinding eye diseases. Dr. Lund recognizes that for patients and their families this type of research is a race toward treatment,” according to Steven Dezii, a foundation trustee and spokesperson.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.hsc.utah.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>