Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War veterans


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is nearly four times as common in veterans of the first Persian Gulf War as in nonveterans, according to a new study. The study, to be published May 14, 2004 in the online edition of Muscle & Nerve, examined the possibility that genetic factors may play a role in developing the disease. The full study will be available via Wiley InterScience .

Fatigue that has no known medical cause, lasts more than six months, produces a substantial decrease of activity and is accompanied by symptoms associated with infection, as well as rheumatological, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, is known as CFS; idiopathic chronic fatigue (ICF) is fatigue without other symptoms or identifiable cause. CFS/ICF sometimes occurs in an almost epidemic fashion, such as in Gulf War veterans, but its cause is unknown. Genetic factors appear to play a role in both Gulf War veterans and civilian populations. Partial defects in one or more genes combined with environmental factors can result in conditions that include fatigue as a prominent feature. Previous studies have shown that mutations in the myoadenylate deaminase gene (AMPD1) and the carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2) gene can produce pain, stiffness, cramps or fatigue following strenuous exercise, while a genetic variant known as the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme or ACE (DCP1) gene may impact performance and endurance in trained athletes and army recruits.

In this new study, Drs.Georgirene Vladutiu of the State University of New York at Buffalo and Benjamin Natelson of UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School evaluated DNA from blood samples collected from 49 Gulf War veterans and 61 nonveterans with CFS/IFS and 30 veterans and 45 nonveterans who were healthy. Blood samples were analyzed for mutations in the AMPD1, DCP1, and CPT2 genes. No significant differences were found in variations of the AMPD1 and CPT2 genes in any of the four groups. However, Gulf War veterans with CFS/ICF showed a higher prevalence of the D variant in the DCP1 gene. Veterans with the DD genotype (which has been associated with alcoholism and cardiac disease) were 8 times more likely to develop CFS or ICF than those with the lower prevalence II genotype.

These results suggest that there may be an interaction between these genetic variants and some factor unique to deployment to the Persian Gulf. If they are supported by future research examining veterans of different wars and war zones, it may be that variants of the ACE gene could be a biological marker for increased risk of war-related illness.

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Diagnoses: When Are Several Opinions Better Than One?
19.07.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht High in calories and low in nutrients when adolescents share pictures of food online
07.04.2016 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

24.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>