Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lactation program increases rate of breast feeding

24.03.2004


A lactation program targeting mothers of very low birth weight babies (VLBWB) can be successful in raising the rate of breast-feeding among this group



Mother’s milk is well documented to be the optimal source of nutrition for newborn babies; however, mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW) babies (those who weigh less than 1500 grams -- approximately 3.3 pounds) are among the least likely groups to initiate and sustain lactation.

Now, a study published in the Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing shows that a lactation program targeting mothers of very low birth weight babies (VLBWB) can be successful in raising the rate of breast-feeding among this group.


The Mother’s Milk Club at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago is a lactation program that helps mothers whose children are cared for in the Rush neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). All mothers have access to the support and educational components in the program, and special services have been implemented to address the unique needs of low-income women with VLBW infants. Additionally, the women are invited to return to weekly luncheon meetings for continued lactation assistance after they are discharged from the hospital.

Very little data exists on the breast-feeding rates of women with VLBW infants. Most studies do not distinguish these women from mothers of low birth weight babies (those who are less than 2500 grams -- approximately 5.5 lbs). According to the study’s lead investigator, Paula Meier, DNSc, director for Clinical Research and Lactation at Rush University Medical Center, VLBW infants are born disproportionately to low income or African American women. Both groups are much less likely to breast feed than Caucasian mothers or those with higher incomes.

The goal of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the Rush Mother’s Milk Club by comparing it with the target goal of 75 percent of all new mothers breastfeeding as set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2010 report.

Meier analyzed records of 207 VLBW infants and their mothers. Following birth, the infants spent time in the Rush Neonatal Intensive Care Unit during a 24-month period between 1997 and 1998. Of these 207 women, 44. 9 percent were African American; 35.7 percent were Caucasian; 17.9 percent were Latina; and 1.4 percent were Asian American. Of these eligible mothers, 151 or 73 percent initiated breast-feeding in the NICU.

Meier’s report shows the Rush Mother’s Milk Club produced higher rates of breast- feeding than the national average, which includes mothers of healthy babies who do not have risk factors for establishing and maintaining lactation. National data from 1998 showed that only 64 percent of all mothers breast-fed immediately after giving birth.

"I think this study shows that if you design a program that seeks to educate new mothers of very low birth weight babies about the importance of their milk in helping with optimal growth and health, you can show success with initiating and sustaining lactation," Meier said. She pointed out that programs targeting an inner city population of mothers with VLBW infants must take into account other factors that might prohibit them from providing milk for their VLBW infants.

"Our program, for instance, uses a taxi service that allows women without cars to come to the hospital to participate in the Friday luncheons," she said. Additionally, Meier has recruited and trained five breast-feeding peer counselors to help the new mothers with breast-feeding. All five had infants in the Rush NICU and participated in a five-day certification course offered by La Leche League.

"Mother’s milk is protective against many costly and handicapping conditions for these vulnerable babies, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in hospital costs for just pennies a day," said Meier. "For example, our rate for necrotizing enterocolitis (an inflammation of the bowels) is only 4% in babies under 1000g, (approximately 2.2 pounds) which is markedly lower than that for the US in general (10-12%). We attribute this to the fact that nearly 100% of our babies in this weight group receive their mothers’ milk," said Meier.

Meier pointed out that the average case of necrotizing enterocolitis costs $74,000 to treat and adds 22 days to the hospital stay, jeopardizing the health of the infant and creating unnecessary trauma among new parents.

Chris Martin | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rush.edu/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>