Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Ki-67 biomarker a strong predictor of outcome for prostate cancer patients


The largest known biomarker study for prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy shows that the presence Ki-67 may be a significant predictor of patient outcome for men with prostate cancer treated with both radiation and hormones. The study was sponsored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and was presented today by Alan Pollack, M.D., Ph.D., chairman of radiation oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, at the 45th annual meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Ki-67 biomarker is a proliferation antigen that is detected by a process called immunohistochemical staining. When a tumor cell tests positive for Ki-67, the tumor is actively growing.

Prostate cancers typically have very low percentages of growing cells and they grow slowly. Pollack and others have previously shown in smaller studies that the greater the proportion of prostate tumor cells with Ki-67, the more aggressive the cancer. Prior studies involved small patient numbers and did not definitively establish the usefulness of the Ki-67 biomarker.

"Our study conclusively shows that Ki-67 was the most significant determinant of distant metastasis and death in prostate cancer patients," explained Pollack. "The relationship of Ki-67 to patient outcome is a continuous function, wherein the higher the percent of Ki-67, the greater the risk of an adverse result. In addition, Ki-67, along with PSA, Gleason score and stage, appears to be valuable in determining whether high-risk patients may be spared long-term androgen deprivation."

Pollack says that a consistent threshold for the application of Ki-67 on a routine basis has not been previously established. In this study, when greater than 7.1% of the tumor cells stained for Ki-67, there was a significantly increased risk of distant metastasis and death due to prostate cancer.

Furthermore, Pollack adds, Ki-67 should be very useful in stratifying patients in future clinical trials.

Other authors in the study include Michelle DeSilvio, American College Of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pa.; Li-Yan Khor, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pa.; Rile Li, Baylor School of Medicine, Houston, Tex.; Tahseen Al-Saleem, Fox Chase Cancer Center; M. Elizabeth Hammond, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City; Varagur Venkatesan, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Roger Byhardt, University of California San Francisco, Calif.; Gerald E. Hanks, retired from Fox Chase Cancer Center; Mack Roach, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; William Shipley, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; and Howard Sandler, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, one of the nation’s first comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute in 1974, conducts basic, clinical, population and translational research; programs of prevention, detection and treatment of cancer; and community outreach. For more information about Fox Chase activities, visit the Center’s web site at or call 1-888-FOX CHASE.

Karen Carter Mallet | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Earlier flowering of modern winter wheat cultivars

20.03.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

Smithsonian researchers name new ocean zone: The rariphotic

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>