Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nursing teams in care homes could reduce hospital admissions

22.07.2008
Bringing a community nursing and physiotherapy team into residential care homes for older people improves quality of life and reduces hospital admissions, according to a new evaluation study's reports published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

The research, undertaken by the University of the West of England, Bristol (UWE) and the University of Warwick, found that savings made through reduced hospital admissions and delayed transfer to nursing homes offset any potential costs of the scheme. The study suggests that the overall cost ranged from an added £2.70 a week per resident to a more likely weekly saving of £36.90.

The two-year pilot scheme was set up in a group of local authority residential homes caring for 131 long-term residents as a joint initiative between Bath & North East Somerset (B&NES) Local Authority and the local Primary Care Trust. In tandem with providing nursing and physiotherapy to residents, the dedicated team also developed the nursing skills of designated care home staff through a training programme funded by Skills for Care.

Researcher Deidre Wild from UWE said, “Allowing people to remain in their care homes by bringing in specialist care during episodes of illness was greatly valued by both residents and staff. Staying in a familiar environment gave care home residents a greater sense of security during challenging times.”

The dedicated team (known as 'the in-reach team') was able to detect and deal with undiagnosed illnesses, producing long-term benefits for residents' health and quality of life. This was especially important in cases where, due to conditions such as dementia, residents found it difficult to communicate their symptoms to staff.

Professor Ala Szczepura of Warwick University reported that, “During the two year study, between 80 and nearly 200 potential hospital admissions were averted, and 20 early discharges made possible. Beyond the clear benefits cited by residents and staff, we estimate that investment in such a service could produce savings of up to £250,000 per annum to the Primary Care Trust and Local Authority.”

Commenting on the research, Jane Ashman, Strategic Director of Adult Social Services and Housing, B&NES said: ”This has been a really important project for the Council and the Primary Care Trust looking at an often neglected area, the health needs of people in residential care homes. We are now looking, with the PCT, at how to take the best learning from this and build it into our future joint community provision. Meeting the health needs of people in care homes is as important as for those in their own homes in reducing hospital admissions as well as improving quality of life.”

This research emerges at a time of change in health care provision with increasing emphasis on the integration of health and social care by community services so that hospital trusts can concentrate on providing acute care. It highlights the need for more detailed health assessments of residents in care homes than is currently carried out.

Lesley Drake | alfa
Further information:
http://www.uwe.ac.uk
http://info.uwe.ac.uk/news/uwenews/article.asp?item=1245&year=2008

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their minds
28.11.2017 | University of Chicago Medical Center

nachricht The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
17.11.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>