Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Herring ­- both healthful and environmentally friendly

16.06.2008
Herring is just as good for the heart and blood vessels as other fatty fishes. This is shown in a doctoral dissertation from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. It is the first specific study of the health effects of herring. Unlike many other kinds of fish, herring is very inexpensive, and it is one of the few species that are fished in an ecologically sustainable manner.

In earlier studies of the health effects of fatty fish, researchers have addressed a mixture of fish species. Helen Lindqvist, a doctoral candidate at the Division for Food Science at Chalmers, can now present the health effects of herring alone.

"The combination of various compounds is rather similar among fatty fish species," she reports.

"Herring is extremely rich in omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, selenium, and vitamin B12, compounds that most people need to eat more of. But one of the greatest advantages of herring is there is still lots of it available. Today only a small fraction of herring catches is used for food. Most of it goes to animal fodder. It would be more resource-effective if we ate more herring, instead of grinding catches into fishmeal to feed salmon, for example."

Helen Lindqvist carried out four studies, three on humans and one on rats, in which she was able to demonstrate several health benefits of consuming herring: The content of "good cholesterol," HDL, increased in the blood of humans. In the rat study the content of oxidation products declined in the blood, and the size of fat cells and blood lipid content both improved. The omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in the blood increase with the ingestion of fatty fish, which in turn was shown to be associated with less atherosclerosis in humans.

All of these factors are clearly related to cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes.

Most the health effects of herring are due to its content of omega 3 fatty acids, which are found in fish oil. But Helen Lindqvist has also shown that parts of the fish other than its oil are healthful, by dividing up the fish into various fractions in one of the studies. The liquid fraction--which does not contain fatty acids-­reduced the amount of oxidation products in the blood. In other words, herring contains antioxidants that are lost if you substitute fish oil capsules for fish. What's more, whole herring contains a number of proteins and vitamins.

In one of the studies Helen Lindqvist collaborated with restaurateur Leif Mannerström, who created several innovative herring recipes.

"Not everyone loves the typical herring taste, but it's not at all noticeable in some of the recipes," she says. "Herring can be prepared like any other fish-Thai-inspired or with curry, for example."

The dissertation "Influence of Herring (Clupea harengus) Intake on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease" was defended on June 13.

Dissertation abstract, see link below

Pictures can be downloaded, se link below

For more information, please contact:
Helen Lindqvist, Food Science, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
Phone: +46 (0)31-772 38 11; cell phone: +46 (0)739-38 34 84
helen.lindqvist@chalmers.se
Principal Supervisor: Professor Ann-Sofie Sandberg, Food Science, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
Phone: +46 (0)31-772 38 30
ann-sofie.sandberg@chalmers.se
Auxiliary Supervisor: Associate Professor Ingrid Undeland, Food Science, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
Phone: +46 (0)31-772 38 30
undeland@chalmers.se

Sofie Hebrand | idw
Further information:
http://www.vr.se
http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/cpl/record/index.xsql?pubid=71009
http://www.chalmers.se/chem/EN/divisions/food-science

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>