Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study proves that children suffering from cancer, and their families, undergo social isolation

30.05.2008
How does the suffering caused by childhood cancer develop? What feelings and worries arise? What are the patients’ needs and the experiences they live? And how does the disease affect the lives of both the children and their families? These are some of the issues analyzed by Pilar González Carrión, researcher from the Department of Social Anthropology of the University of Granada, in her doctoral thesis.

This study, led by Arturo Álvarez Roldán, aspired to understand the implications of cancer for children diagnosed with the disease as well as their families, their experiences and worries, their relationship with the health system and their care needs during the disease treatment.

In order to carry out this study, the author interviewed 14 children staying at the Hospital Universitario Virgen Nieves or the Hospital Universitario San Cecilio de Granada and 22 mothers between June 2003 and October 2005, as well as their families during the three years previous to the study. This work combined participatory observation together with individual and group interviews with children and mothers in 14 clinic interviews.

Strong emotional impact

According to the results of her work, the researcher states that cancer diagnosis “causes a strong emotional impact” on the child, with negative feelings of uncertainty, fault, powerlessness and significant confusion”. From that moment on, the child, mother and, partly, the rest of the family life “revolve around the disease and treatment.”

The most traumatic experiences are connected with the procedures, the treatment side effects and the isolation imposed by neutropenia, affecting the children not only physically and psychologically but also at a social and a school level.

In the work, carried out by the University of Granada, there appears a significant quantity of needs and improvement proposals, notably that of adapting the sanitary resources to the children and mothers’ specific needs and providing real, comprehensive attention to these patients. Nevertheless, the care received is well appreciated by those affected, who value the professional support.

Since the diagnosis of the disease, mothers express a change in their life values, “giving more importance to the day by day, to each moment, to the emotional aspects, and not to future or material things,” explains González Carrión.

The stigma goes on

“The data about successful treatments has not had a profound effect,” says the researcher, “as the diagnosis is still related to the idea of a death threat. The metaphors used when talking about cancer aroused suffering, which contributes to the perpetuation of the disease’s negative aspects. The stigma surrounding the disease, together with the delicate state of health in certain periods produces social isolation in the child and the family.”

The information obtained through the surveys of the doctoral thesis is of great interest for getting to know situations experienced by those affected, which means the possibility of naturally providing a more suitable assistance, adapted to their situation. The results of this research have been published in the magazine “NURE Investigation”.

Reference
Pilar González Carrión. Department of Social Anthropology of the University of Granada
Tlf. Number: +34 958242321
E-mail: mariap.gonzalez.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/verNota/prensa.php?nota=522

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Smart Data Transformation – Surfing the Big Wave
02.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Climate change could outpace EPA Lake Champlain protections
18.11.2016 | University of Vermont

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Closing the carbon loop

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>