Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study proves that children suffering from cancer, and their families, undergo social isolation

30.05.2008
How does the suffering caused by childhood cancer develop? What feelings and worries arise? What are the patients’ needs and the experiences they live? And how does the disease affect the lives of both the children and their families? These are some of the issues analyzed by Pilar González Carrión, researcher from the Department of Social Anthropology of the University of Granada, in her doctoral thesis.

This study, led by Arturo Álvarez Roldán, aspired to understand the implications of cancer for children diagnosed with the disease as well as their families, their experiences and worries, their relationship with the health system and their care needs during the disease treatment.

In order to carry out this study, the author interviewed 14 children staying at the Hospital Universitario Virgen Nieves or the Hospital Universitario San Cecilio de Granada and 22 mothers between June 2003 and October 2005, as well as their families during the three years previous to the study. This work combined participatory observation together with individual and group interviews with children and mothers in 14 clinic interviews.

Strong emotional impact

According to the results of her work, the researcher states that cancer diagnosis “causes a strong emotional impact” on the child, with negative feelings of uncertainty, fault, powerlessness and significant confusion”. From that moment on, the child, mother and, partly, the rest of the family life “revolve around the disease and treatment.”

The most traumatic experiences are connected with the procedures, the treatment side effects and the isolation imposed by neutropenia, affecting the children not only physically and psychologically but also at a social and a school level.

In the work, carried out by the University of Granada, there appears a significant quantity of needs and improvement proposals, notably that of adapting the sanitary resources to the children and mothers’ specific needs and providing real, comprehensive attention to these patients. Nevertheless, the care received is well appreciated by those affected, who value the professional support.

Since the diagnosis of the disease, mothers express a change in their life values, “giving more importance to the day by day, to each moment, to the emotional aspects, and not to future or material things,” explains González Carrión.

The stigma goes on

“The data about successful treatments has not had a profound effect,” says the researcher, “as the diagnosis is still related to the idea of a death threat. The metaphors used when talking about cancer aroused suffering, which contributes to the perpetuation of the disease’s negative aspects. The stigma surrounding the disease, together with the delicate state of health in certain periods produces social isolation in the child and the family.”

The information obtained through the surveys of the doctoral thesis is of great interest for getting to know situations experienced by those affected, which means the possibility of naturally providing a more suitable assistance, adapted to their situation. The results of this research have been published in the magazine “NURE Investigation”.

Reference
Pilar González Carrión. Department of Social Anthropology of the University of Granada
Tlf. Number: +34 958242321
E-mail: mariap.gonzalez.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/verNota/prensa.php?nota=522

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>