Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study provides new understanding of forces behind seasonal flu virus evolution

21.04.2008
Do influenza viruses persist in low levels year-round in the northern and southern hemispheres, or does a new crop of the virus emerge afresh in tropical zones such as Southeast Asia before spreading into temperate regions around the globe" Researchers have provided an answer to this long-standing question: new strains arise each year.

The new findings should help public health officials more quickly and accurately determine which strains to include in the annual flu vaccine.

The study, supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), appears online in advance of print in the journal Nature.

The researchers analyzed full gene sequences of seasonal influenza virus samples collected from the world’s temperate regions north and south of the equator. Their data comprised full genetic sequences of 1,302 isolates of influenza A virus collected over 12 years from New Zealand and New York state.

By quantifying the degree of genetic diversity among the strains’ subtypes, gene segments and geographic locations, the researchers were able to detect patterns indicating that virus strains do not persist from one flu season to the next in the temperate regions. Therefore, the researchers deduced, new flu strains emerge annually from the tropics.

The international team of researchers included Jeffery K. Taubenberger, M.D., Ph.D., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH; Cecile Viboud, Ph.D., of NIH’s Fogarty International Center; and Edward C. Holmes, Ph.D., of Pennsylvania State University, who received funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH. The gene sequence information is stored in an NIAID-supported and publicly accessible database, the Influenza Genome Sequencing Project http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/research/resources/mscs/Influenza/.

ARTICLE: A Rambaut et al. The genomic and epidemiological dynamics of human influenza A virus. Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature06945 (2008).

WHO: NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., is available to comment. Jeffery K. Taubenberger, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, NIAID, is also available.

CONTACT: To schedule interviews, contact Anne A. Oplinger in the NIAID Office of Communications and Government Relations at 301-402-1663 or niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov.

NIAID is a component of the National Institutes of Health. NIAID supports basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose and treat infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections, influenza, tuberculosis, malaria and illness from potential agents of bioterrorism. NIAID also supports research on basic immunology, transplantation and immune-related disorders, including autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergies.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH)--The Nation's Medical Research Agency--includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments and cures for both common and rare diseases.

News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

Anne A. Oplinger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.niaid.nih.gov
http://www.nih.gov

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>