Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Understanding the thoughts and feelings of Internet users

17.04.2008
TextImi is a system that helps people understand the thoughts of others from large volumes of text through a collaboration between computer analysis and human interpretation. The system can be used in for marketing surveys coordinated with network research systems, customer voice analysis, public comment analysis and more.
Development of TextImi, a Text Semantic Space Analysis System:
- Thoughts and feelings of those who read from the Internet -
FUKAYA, Masahiro. Professor
Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University
Introduction
The development of the Internet and information technology has now enabled us to collect a huge volume of text data on various matters discussed by people themselves. By processing this enormous quantity of text data, we can learn how people think and feel about different issues. TextImi is a system that helps people understand the thoughts of others from large volumes of text through a collaboration between computer analysis and human interpretation. The system can be used in a wide range of applications such as marketing surveys coordinated with network research systems, customer voice analysis, and public comment analysis.

Human semantics research: Sociosemantics and development of TextImi

Development research for this project originated in the Fukaya Laboratory as part of research on "The Human Semantic World" and is now proceeding as a project of "Sociosemantics: Development of Research Procedures for Web Society " in the Policy COE. A social phenomenon is a composition and integration of human actions. Human actions reflect individual issues that give rise to those actions. We customarily call the internal world where meaning is developed a "semantic world". Human actions are, so to speak, products of the human semantic world. Consequently, the semantic viewpoint is an essential element for the study of society.

However, full-fledged development of study of the human semantic world has been impeded until very recently, mainly by the constraint of data availability. But development of the Internet and IT has made it possible to collect a large volume of text data on various issues discussed by people in their own words. A theory and method for extracting human semantic worlds out of this enormous volume of data expressing meaning will allow earnest research into the human semantic world.

The theory needed is a language and communication theory that captures the meaning of words contained in text data as the meaning for people. Fukaya and Tanaka built a new theoretical paradigm to embody that doctrine (Theory of Word Significance, awarded a Japan Linguistics and Language Education Institution Prize, 1996). This theory opened a clear prospect that an experimental study on the basis of the paradigm would be promising, and that the study of the human semantic world would be greatly advanced by computer processing of large text data volume (approx. 2000). Collaboration also began with the Research Headquarters of Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd on development of a text analysis system (approx. 2002). This project was adopted as a Policy COE project, and development research continues (Keio Gijuku Prize, 2003).

Work on the text semantic space analysis system is now proceeding as part of efforts to create a new academic discipline, sociosemantics, that investigates the human semantic world empirically. What do people think or feel about a certain matter? Or what concepts are contained in the conventional common sense that underlies everyday human thoughts and behaviors? With the aid of computers, large volumes of text data will clarify these type of questions. These questions are at the heart of the new discipline of sociosemantics that we seek. This system is a technology at the core of the effort and has, at the same time, broad applicability.

Contents and features of technology

The text semantic space analysis system that I am introducing today has been developed to its current functional state with these considerations in mind and is termed TextImi (a nickname), Version 3. Connected to a network research system, for example, applications of the system include marketing surveys and analysis of policy-related public comments. Our development research has now reached the stage of demonstration in practical applications. Examples of the technical features TextImi embodies may be summarized as follows:

1. Based on a paradigm of language and communication theory that handles word meanings as understood by people.

2. System design concept of collaboration between computer analysis and human analyst's interpretation.

3. Extraction of statements (chunk of fundamental meaning) not so small as to cause loss of meaning.

4. Efficient support for tagging of small statements (aftercoding)

5. Builds semantic space through text mining and human analyst's interpretation

For inquiries about this technology, contact the Intellectual Property Center, Keio University.
Direct line: +81-(0)35-427-1678
E-mail address: toiawasesaki-ipc@adst.keio.ac.jp

Center for Research Promotion | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.ipc.keio.ac.jp/english/inventions/hot/2008_03/01_fukaya.html

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>