Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

With annual deaths from malaria on the rise: Scientists ask 'where is all the money going?'

14.04.2008
New study questions use of millions of dollars dedicated to malaria prevention

A new study in the April issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, asks the question “With more than $220 million dollars dedicated to malaria treatment and prevention, why is the annual mortality rate from malaria on the rise" .

The study, entitled “Malaria Vector Management: Where Have We Come From and Where Are we Headed"” conducted by researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, examines the current methods used to control and prevent the spread of malaria.

Robert J. Novak, Ph.D., professor of medicine, division of infectious diseases and Ephantus J. Muturi, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow, division of infectious diseases, who lead the study, say the millions of dollars currently being spent on malaria primarily address the mortality of pregnant women and infants. And, while these efforts are important and have resulted in successfully decreasing the death rate in that group with the use of bed nets and insecticides, the disease has burgeoned among teens and adults who are not being protected.

Dr. Muturi, a native of Kenya, who himself has been stricken by malaria, finds the lack of immediate attention frustrating on a more personal level. “I have family in Kenya who are at risk every day. Bed nets work at night and have helped contain the spread of malaria, but what about the hours when people aren’t in their beds" The protection during the day is minimal with current insecticides that cannot be used on a regular basis. The search for a vaccine is necessary, but so are the immediate needs of at-risk communities.”

The scientists say that organizations such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and The World Health Organization’s Roll Back Malaria, lead in funding research for drug and vaccine development and to provide bed nets, but little of this funding is directed to help identify and address environmental factors that contribute to the growth and spread of this fatal disease.

“We need to address three issues – vectors, parasites, and protect the human host, in an integrated fashion” says Dr. Novak. He explains that by working with environmental and epidemiological information that is already available, researchers can determine where malaria mosquito populations are most concentrated and then design a control program with the right preventive methods. “We can quickly access information by working with the Integrated Malaria Management Consortium. But, funding is needed to know where, when and how to apply the current tools that we have to be most effective with disease prevention. And, to properly educate the at-risk populations so they can better protect themselves.”

Some of the tools that Dr. Novak refers to include modifying the environmental sources proven to house malaria mosquitoes; using environmentally friendly insecticides; determining the exact sections of marsh land, rivers and rice paddies that contain mosquito larvae, and only treating those areas during breeding times to more effectively manage the mosquito population. Identifying these “hot spots” is not only more environmentally friendly, but is also cost effective.

“Relying on drugs and bed nets is the same mentality as in the 1960s and we know that thinking didn’t work since malaria is still here stronger than ever, so we need to attack the disease in new and more efficient methods,” says Dr. Novak. “By properly combining past successful tactics in managing malaria with new technology in insecticides, surveillance, GIS/remote satellite, PCR and new drugs, malaria can become a minor disease.”

Rosalind D'Eugenio | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.environics-usa.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

nachricht Disarray in the brain
18.12.2017 | Universität zu Lübeck

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gran Chaco: Biodiversity at High Risk

17.01.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Only an atom thick: Physicists succeed in measuring mechanical properties of 2D monolayer materials

17.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Fraunhofer HHI receives AIS Technology Innovation Award 2018 for 3D Human Body Reconstruction

17.01.2018 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>