Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Landmark observational study aims to improve osteoporosis care standards worldwide

11.04.2008
Multi-national study to follow 60,000 women for 5 years

Nearly 60,000 women aged 55 years and older have enrolled in a landmark, multi-national study that will focus on the management of osteoporosis across the globe. Launch of the Global Longitudinal Registry of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) was announced today at ECCEO 8 (Eighth European Congress on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis) in Istanbul, Turkey. This groundbreaking observational study (registry) in osteoporosis aims to gain insights to improve the standard of care for postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis.

“We know that there are patients at high risk for osteoporosis, sometimes already having suffered a broken bone, who aren’t getting diagnosed and treated. We have to figure out why not,” said Dr. Robert Lindsay, GLOW Executive Committee Co-Chair and Chief of Internal Medicine at Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY. “Globally we have an aging female population that wants to maintain independence and vitality. We can help by finding the key to improving diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating disease.”

GLOW will monitor tens of thousands of older women who have visited a primary care physician in the past two years. Since patient recruitment for GLOW is not linked to osteoporosis diagnosis and does not alter physician practice, the study provides a good representation of “typical” older women and the bone health care they receive in the real world. Women are participating from 17 cities in 10 countries on 3 continents.

“We want to understand regional differences in physician and patient behavior and how that impacts patient outcomes,” said Professor Pierre Delmas, GLOW Executive Committee Co-Chair and Professor of Medicine and Rheumatology, Université Claude Bernard, Lyon, France. “Hopefully, armed with that knowledge we will be able to recommend best practices and improve the management of osteoporosis worldwide.”

GLOW is being conducted by The Center for Outcomes Research (COR), University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), with the support of an unrestricted research grant from The Alliance for Better Bone Health. The Alliance for Better Bone Health is a collaboration between sanofi-aventis and Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals.

“We are grateful for the commitment of the sponsors and scientific advisors to the GLOW project. We anticipate that these data will provide important information to improve the quality of lives of women at risk for osteoporotic fractures," said Dr. Fred Anderson, Director of the Center for Outcomes Research and research professor of surgery and medicine at UMMS.

.“This pioneering initiative will be the first comprehensive multi-national look into the relationship between risk factors, patient outcomes and treatment patterns for osteoporosis.”

Milestone data from GLOW will be communicated on an ongoing basis at international medical conferences and through peer-reviewed publications. For more information on GLOW, please visit: www.outcomes.org/glow/

About GLOW

GLOW is a prospective, longitudinal, observational study of women over 55 years of age who visited a primary care physician during the two years prior to the study. Women were recruited through 700 primary care physicians in 17 cities in North America, Europe, and Australia. GLOW will gather information on osteoporosis risk factors, treatment approaches, patient behavior, and fracture outcomes with an annual patient survey over a 5 year period.

GLOW study sites are the following:
Lyon, France
Paris, France
Leuven, Belgium
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Barcelona, Spain
Essen, Germany
Verona, Italy
Southampton, UK
West Haverstraw, NY USA
Worcester, MA USA
Pittsburgh, PA USA
Seattle, WA USA
Cincinnati, OH USA
Los Angeles, CA USA
Birmingham, AL USA
Hamilton, Ontario Canada
Sydney, Australia
About osteoporosis
Osteoporosis-related fragility fractures are an international public health problem responsible for increased mortality, functional impairment and added health care costs. Estimates are that between 40 and 50 percent of white women above the age of 50 in North America, Europe and Australia will incur an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime. Although their rates are lower, non-white women and men are also susceptible. Because the likelihood of fragility fractures increases dramatically with age, fracture numbers are projected to rise as the population ages.

About the Center for Outcomes Research (COR)

COR is based at the University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, USA. The mission of COR is to collect and evaluate data that reflect real world practices and outcomes and to provide physicians with confidential reports that allow comparison of their practices to evidence based performance standards.

Helen Crow | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.outcomes.org
http://www.umassmed.edu/index.aspx

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
17.11.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar

20.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

Filling the gap: High-latitude volcanic eruptions also have global impact

20.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

Water world

20.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>