Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hyperactive girls face problems as adults

20.03.2008
Hyperactive young girls are more likely to have poor school-leaving qualifications, become hooked on smoking and fall into mentally abusive relationships later in life, according to a collaborative study led by UCL (University College London) and the University of Montreal.

Few studies have looked at the consequences of aggressive and hyperactive behaviour in girls, but the latest study shows that hyperactivity combined with aggressive behaviour in girls as young as six may lead to greater problems with abusive relationships, a lack of job prospects and teenage pregnancies.

The study, published in the latest issue of the journal Archives of General Psychiatry, followed the lives of Canadian girls from the age of six until they reached 21, to understand the link between hyperactive and aggressive behaviour in childhood and adjustment problems in early adulthood. Of the 881 girls monitored, around one in 10 showed high levels of hyperactive behaviour, while another one in ten showed both high levels of hyperactive and physically aggressive behaviour.

Young girls displaying hyperactive behaviour (restless, jumping up and down, not keeping still, squirmy or fidgety) and those showing physical aggression as well (fighting, bullying, kicking, biting or hitting) were found to have a high risk of developing adjustment problems in adulthood, in particular addiction to smoking, mutually and psychologically abusive relationships with partners, and low educational attainment. However, only females with both hyperactivity and physical aggression were found to report later problems of physical as well as psychological aggression towards their partner, along with early pregnancy and dependency on welfare.

Dr Nathalie Fontaine, UCL Psychology, says: "Our study suggests that girls showing chronic hyperactivity and physical aggression in childhood should be targeted by intensive prevention programmes in elementary school, because they are more likely to have serious adjustment problems later in life. Programmes targeting only physical aggression may be missing a significant proportion of at-risk girls. In fact, our results suggest that targeting hyperactive behaviour will include the vast majority of aggressive girls.

“However, not all hyperactive and physically aggressive girls grow up to have serious adjustment. In our study, we found that about 25 per cent of the girls with behavioural problems in childhood did not have adjustment problems in adulthood, while more than a quarter developed at least three adjustment problems. We need more research to understand the factors that prevent or trigger the development of such problems. Other risk factors more specific to girls, such as social and relational aggression (e.g. rumour spreading, peer group exclusion) also need to be considered in future investigations.”

Ruth Metcalfe | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/media/library/hyperactivity

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>