Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New TB test means quicker and easier diagnosis for patients

10.03.2008
A new blood test could enable doctors to rule out tuberculosis (TB) infection within days rather than weeks, according to a new study published this week in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

The study, by researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, shows that doctors can determine that a patient does not have tuberculosis with 99% accuracy when using the new blood test, ELISpot-Plus, in conjunction with a skin test known as tuberculin skin testing, already in use.

TB is difficult to diagnose because many of its symptoms, such as fever, fatigue, and loss of appetite, are also commonly found in many other conditions. The combination of ELISpot-Plus and tuberculin skin testing is able to rule out TB within 48 hours, providing a much quicker result than existing testing methods, for which results take up to several weeks.

The new test combination could prevent patients who do not have TB from being subjected to further lengthy TB tests, and allow doctors to begin investigating other explanations for such patients' symptoms.

The new study showed that ELISpot-Plus alone was accurately able to determine TB infection in 89% of cases and tuberculin skin testing alone was able to determine TB infection in 79% of cases. However, using both tests together was able to rule out TB infection with an accuracy of 99%.

The ELISpot-Plus test works by detecting signs of a particular response that occurs when the immune system encounters TB infection. The test looks for a type of protein known as interferon-Y. This is secreted by T cells in the immune system when they encounter antigens found in the bacterium mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes most cases of TB.

The tuberculin skin test commonly gives falsely positive results if a patient has previously been vaccinated against TB, because vaccination causes a reaction in the immune system which looks very similar to its reaction against actual TB infection. ELISpot-Plus is able to distinguish TB infection from BCG vaccination because it uses special antigens that only pick out the T cells that are induced by TB infection, and not those induced by vaccination.

The new test is useful in determining a patient's TB status but the results are not able to accurately reveal whether a patient with TB has it the 'active' form, which causes symptoms, or the dormant 'latent' form, which does not. This means that patients with a positive result would need further testing. However, the new test combination should allow doctors to establish which patients require further TB testing and which do not.

At present, the 'gold standard' for confirming whether or not a patient has TB involves growing cultures from sputum samples from a patient and analysing these cultures to see if they contain traces of mycobacterium tuberculosis.

This means that patients being tested for TB need to stay in hospital for three days, undergoing invasive procedures, to obtain necessary samples. They then wait for several weeks for the results.

Professor Ajit Lalvani, from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London, who led the study team, said: "Our new test could revolutionise the way we manage people with suspected TB. At the moment, it can take quite a long time to figure out whether or not a patient has the disease, because it can mimic many different conditions and present in many different ways.

"Our study shows that by using the new blood test, together with the old skin test, we could establish if someone does not have TB within two days of them coming in for tests, allowing doctors to focus on other possible diagnoses. If we cannot rule out TB, we can then refer them for further testing to confirm the diagnosis. Using this new system would allow us to treat patients much more quickly and effectively," added Professor Lalvani.

The ELISpot-Plus device is not yet licensed and they intend to make it available to as large a number of TB patients as possible, including those in the developing world who carry the largest burden of TB, through ethical commercialisation.

The study looked at 389 patients recruited at Northwick Park Hospital in London and Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham. The researchers compared the performance of tuberculin skin testing and two blood tests, ELISpot and ELISpot-Plus, both individually and used in combination, in diagnosing patients with suspected active TB. The study was funded by the Wellcome Trust, the Sir Halley Stewart Trust and the UK Department of Health.

Britain is the only country in Western Europe where TB is on the rise and London, which carries almost half the national burden, is Europe's TB capital. Professor Lalvani leads a new, specially created TB Task Force at Imperial College London and its Academic Health Science Centre, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. The TB Task Force aims to develop and deploy effective new weapons in the battle against TB, both in London and globally, through cutting-edge scientific research.

Professor Steve Smith, the Principal of the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London and Chief Executive of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, said: "Our new Academic Health Science Centre integrates healthcare services with teaching and research to take the world's best research from bench to bedside - giving patients quicker access to new medical advances. We established Professor Lalvani's department because we value his patient-centred research and care deeply about London's growing TB problem. The work of Professor Lalvani and his team is an excellent example of world-class research providing significant benefits for our patients".

Laura Gallagher | alfa
Further information:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

nachricht Urbanization to convert 300,000 km2 of prime croplands
27.12.2016 | Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) gGmbH

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle

17.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

17.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice

17.01.2017 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>