Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UK South Asian population less likely to attend cancer screening than non-Asian

06.03.2008
In the first study of its kind, research made available today has revealed that members of the South Asian community are only half as likely to take up an invitation for bowel cancer screening and 15 per cent less likely to attend breast cancer screening than members of the non-Asian community.

Authored by Professor Ala Szczepura at the University of Warwick and funded by the NHS Cancer Screening Programmes, the research is based on a survey of 400,000 people over the period 1989 to 2005.

In response to the findings the Director of the NHS Cancer Screening programmes, Julietta Patnick has today committed the screening programme to working with all Primary Care Trusts to do more to encourage greater uptake among BME communities.

Publication of the research coincides with the 20th anniversary of NHS breast and cervical screening programmes. Since they were launched in 1988 the breast and cervical screening programmes have screened over 70 million women and detected over 100,000 cancers. The NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme was launched in 2006, initially for those aged 60 – 69, and is the first ever screening programme to target both men and women. It is currently being rolled out across the country and will achieve nationwide coverage by the end of 2009.

Key findings include:

• Among the non-Asian population 2 out of 3 individuals invited, participated in bowel screening. Among the South Asian population as a whole this dropped to 1 out of 3, and for members of the Muslim community only 1 out of 4 individuals participated.

• For the breast screening programme a similar pattern is seen. In the non-Asian population three quarters of those invited attended for screening. Among members of the South Asian population this dropped to under two thirds, and for members of the Muslim population was just over half.

• In contrast, the Hindu-Gujarati population had the highest uptake of both bowel and breast cancer screening in the South Asian population.

• Despite the risk of breast cancer increasing with age the number of women in both the South Asian and non Asian communities accepting their invitation decreased as they got older. For bowel screening the reverse is seen and the number of men and women in both communities participating increases as they get older.

• Of those who participated in the bowel screening programme, members of the South Asian community were slower than non-Asians to come forward for further investigation following an initial screen which revealed abnormalities.

• Following basic breast screening all women with an abnormal mammogram attended for breast assessment regardless of ethnicity.

• The research eliminated socio-economic status, age and gender as reasons for the differences in uptake between different groups.

Commenting on the findings Julietta Patnick, Director of the NHS Cancer Screening Programmes said; “The information produced by Professor Szczepura and her team is invaluable. Whilst the findings are specific to the breast and bowel screening programmes, we are continuing the research to extend the findings to the cervical screening programme. We know that encouraging uptake among BME communities is one of our biggest challenges. The Government’s recently published Cancer Reform Strategy highlighted the need to tackle inequalities and this is something we are committed to addressing. We need to support PCTs to redouble their efforts to understand the needs of their local communities to remove barriers and improve accessibility to cancer screening.”

Professor Ala Szczepura said: “This type of information is essential to tailor appropriate and effective interventions and education programmes for the South Asian community. From our findings we can only conclude that cultural differences lie at the heart of the reason why fewer South Asians are coming forward for cancer screening.”

“Improved ethnicity recording by primary care trusts would help us understand why uptake of cancer screening varies so dramatically among black and ethnic minorities. In addition our findings underline the need for health promotion materials specific to certain ethnic groups. This will be crucial to the continued success of the national cancer screening programmes.”

The study examined uptake in the NHS breast and bowel screening programmes among over 400,000 residents in Coventry and Warwickshire. The full research paper is available on request. To identify ethnicity, researchers used name recognition software which is 97% accurate in identifying which ethnic group those attending breast or bowel cancer screening belonged to. Multivariate methods were used to correct for differences in age, gender and socio-economic status amongst the population groups.

For further information please contact

To contact to the University of Warwick's press office contact, Peter Dunn, on 024 76 523708 or 07767 655860 or email p.j.dunn@warwick.ac.uk.

Natalie Orringe or Alessandra Norman on 0207 400 4499 or via press.office@nhscancerscreening.co.uk

To contact Ala Szcepura please email Ala.Szczepura@warwick.ac.uk, or Anil Gumber on anil.gumber@warwick.ac.uk .

Peter Dunn | alfa
Further information:
http://www.warwick.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

28.03.2017 | Life Sciences

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones

28.03.2017 | Information Technology

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts

28.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>