Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Relatives who decline organ donations face conflict and guilt and don’t always follow the wishes of the deceased

17.01.2008
Family members are sometimes unable to carry out their relative’s wish to donate organs when they die, because of conflicting feelings between making a gift of life and protecting the body of the deceased, according to research in the latest Journal of Advanced Nursing.

Researchers from the University of Southampton, UK, spoke to 26 people who had decided not to let their relatives’ bodies be used for organ donations about their views and experiences. The 23 relatives who died ranged from a five-week old baby, who had died of a lung condition, to an 82 year-old man, who died following a stroke.

“Family members who spoke to us were recruited using advertisements in 12 local newspapers, four national newspapers and four hospital intensive care units,” explains lead researcher Dr Magi Sque from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University.

“Face-to-face interviews were carried out with eight parents, ten spouses or partners, two sons, five daughters and one sister.”

An unexpected finding of the study was how many of the study participants and deceased relatives held pro-donation views.

“Despite this, the decision to not donate was still taken,” says Dr Sque.

Twelve family members said they were normally positive about organ donation and nine reported that their relative had indicated that they wanted to be an organ donor. Five said they had mixed feelings about organ donation or knew that their deceased relative didn’t want to be a donor.

In six cases, both the relative and the person who died shared the same positive view about donation, yet it still didn’t take place.

The most commonly reported reason for declining organ donations was because the family member felt the need to protect the body of the deceased. Fifteen participants told the researchers that they didn’t want to relinquish guardianship of the body - they wanted to keep it intact and didn’t want it to be interfered with.

Some also expressed concern that if organs were donated, and then found to be unsuitable, the whole process would have been unnecessary. Others felt their relative should be left in peace.

Other factors included:

•Circumstances at the time of death - people needed time to come to terms with the death of their relative, especially if their death was sudden or their body looked normal.

•Lack of knowledge - some people said they did not have enough information about what organ donation involved.

•The donation discussion - issues were raised around the timing and sensitivity of discussions between relatives and healthcare professionals.

•Witnessing the observable ending of life - some people said they needed to be present when their relative’s heartbeat stopped. That could not always happen if their relative was a donor.

“Many family members who talked to us said they felt guilty and selfish about their decision not to donate, particularly if their relative had said they wanted to be a donor,” says Dr Sque. “They were also relieved to discover they were not the only ones who had declined donation.

“One even said that seeing our newspaper advertisement for the study made her feel less guilty because she realised that she wasn’t alone in her decision.

“Most countries that support organ donation have high refusal rates and we hope that this study will provide some insight into why people don’t allow donations to go ahead.”

The researchers conclude that rather than seeing donation as a ‘gift of life’ many relatives see it as a ‘sacrifice’ – that in allowing the donation to take place they are sacrificing their relative’s intact body for an operation that might not benefit anyone.

“Describing donation as a ‘gift of life’ is over-simplistic and does not reflect the depth and complexity of the process,” says Dr Sque.

“Healthcare professionals need to take these perceptions of ‘gift of life’ and ‘sacrifice’ into account when discussing the issue with the families of potential donors. Exploring and understanding their views may help lead to better management of this delicate process and could potentially increase donation rates.”

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/jan

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>