Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The link between children’s nutrition and the development of adult diseases such as diabetes or allergies

16.01.2008
Researchers from the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Granada, in collaboration with another 38 universities and companies from 16 European countries, will study the effects of children’s nutrition on the onset of cardiovascular problems, diabetes, obesity, allergies, weak bones, neuromotor functioning and children’s behavioural aspects. The EARNEST project (The Early Nutrition Programming Project) aims to help in the development of policies, information campaigns, documents, guides and recommendations on the nutritional components of children’s food, for the improvement of children’s formulas. It also collaborates in the design of plans preventing and avoiding nutrition effects on the metabolism.

Thanks to this project, the University of Granada becomes the only Spanish investigation centre taking part in this ambitious initiative, the first of its kind in Europe. Cristina Campoy Folgoso, the professor heading this initiative in Granada, emphasizes that the “early nutrition programming” is quite a recent subject in the health and science field today. “Different studies show how food can have long-term consequences in children’s growth and health during pregnancy, the breastfeeding period and childhood. Moreover, food can also have influence over the later onset of diseases”, states the researcher.

Study of disease

This project aims to answer the question about the extent of nutrition effects of prenatal, postnatal, and infant diets of someone among the current European population in critical periods of development as well as the efficiency of actions preventing and avoiding long, medium and short-term metabolic effects on health.

The project will tackle randomly assigned clinical tests and nutritional interventions during pregnancy and childhood, pilot studies, tests on animals, cells and genomita, as well as social and economic studies connected with nutrition in the first stages of life and their significance in the development of later diseases.

The researchers hope to find the genetic mechanism of diseases such as diabetes and obesity with this project. “Obesity, a growing global epidemic, begins, partly, during child development –explains professor Campoy Folgoso-. It is known that breastfed children’s growth kinetics differ from those fed with commercial foods. These children easily gain weight and height. Considering these consequences, linked with eating habits, the purpose of this project is to study whether breastfeeding can prevent a later risk of obesity.

About EARNEST

This investigation project is financed by the European Commission and is made up of 38 multidisciplinary groups of professionals from 16 European countries. Scientists from different institutions of all over Europe are involved in it: 33 academic institutions, 5 industries and 7 PYMES companies form the project, coordinated by Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich (Germany). It began in April 2005 and will last until 2010.

* Coordinator: Professor Berthold Koletzko. Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians. Ludwig-Maximilians Universty, Munich, Germany.

* Institutions taking part: Medical Research Council-Institute of Child Health (London, United Kingdom); University of Pécs (Pécs, Hungary); University of Granada (Spain); University of London-Alliance (United Kingdom); Danish Epidemiology Science Centre (Copenhagen, Denmark); Aarhus University (Denmark); Instituto municipal de Investigació Médica (Barcelona, Spain); Inst of Public Health (Oslo, Norwich); University of Bristol Alliance (United Kingdom); The Children’s Memorial Health Institute (Warsaw, Poland); GSF National Research Centre for Environment and Health (Germany); University Hospital Groningen (Holland); Turku University Central Hospital (Turku, Finland); University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Louvain Universities Alliance (Belgium); Rowett Research Institute (Scotland, United Kingdom); University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals (Germany); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France); INSERM (Paris, France); RIVM National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (Holland); Institute of Physiology (Prague, Czech Republic); University Medical Centre (Utrecht, Holland); University of Surrey (United Kingdom).

* Companies: DNA testing Ltd (Scotland, United Kingdom); Schothorst Feed Research (Holland); Ashwell Associates (United Kingdom); RDE Software GmbH (Munich, Germany); Institute for Market Research, Strategy and Planning (Munich, Germany); Arexis (Gothenburg, Sweden); BioScientifica, (Bristol, United Kingdom).

* Industry: Numico (Friedrichsdorf, Germany); Ordesa, (Spain); Orafti (Belgium); Mead Johnson (USA); Nestlé International.

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/verNota/prensa.php?nota=499

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>