Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Microsoft partners with Cass to research entrepreneurial activity

20.12.2007
Study to explore how the trigger points for innovation could be more effective

Microsoft has teamed up with Cass Business School to support a research project which will profile examples of hidden innovation and entrepreneurial activity in the UK. The study will explore the trigger points for innovation and how entrepreneurial success in minority cultures and groups could be transferred to UK society as a whole.

Cass Business School Professors Chris Hendry and Julie Logan will be carrying out the study, which seeks to identify the conditions and environment for the UK to flourish as an innovation powerhouse.

Although the UK is seen as a nation of inventors, it is often poor at turning innovation into economic gain. Subsequently, rates of innovation and entrepreneurship are perceived as being low, particularly in such groups as ethnic minorities, women, older workers and other ‘hidden innovators’.

From the research, due for release in early 2008, the Cass team aim to derive a better understanding of these ‘hidden innovators’ by developing a number of case studies of successful innovations that have come from social groups that are often neglected. The case studies will focus on three groups: Indian innovators and entrepreneurs, dyslexic and partially sighted innovators and older workers. Microsoft already works with some of these and with other social groups whose innovation potential may be unrealised through their social enterprise programmes.

Professor Logan said: "By highlighting successful cases we hope to get a better understanding of individual motives and how more effective measures can be formulated to encourage members of such groups to see themselves as creators of business enterprises. Furthermore we hope analysis of these cases will offer perspectives that can influence the innovation agenda and future government policy."

"Our research will explore society’s relationship with innovation. It aims to highlight the necessary political, economic, sociological and technological conditions that the UK will need to put in place for innovation and creativity to flourish among the so-called ‘hidden innovators’."

Matt Bishop, Business and Marketing Officer for Microsoft, said: "We are delighted to be working with Cass on this important project, which will yield important insights on how to harness the innovation potential of key groups in society. The UK has the potential to be a major innovation powerhouse and we are committed to helping individuals, businesses and communities unlock their innovation potential."

Dimitra Koutsantoni | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cass.city.ac.uk/story_1_26_90919.html

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies

28.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>