Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PolyU Optometry Experts Prove the Effectiveness of Orthokeratology in Myopic Control

11.01.2012
After a lengthy study spanning over four years, Professor Pauline Cho from the School of Optometry at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) and her research team concluded that orthokeratology not only can correct refractive error, but also effective in slowing the progression of myopia.

Myopia (or shortsightedness) is the most prevalent eye problem in Hong Kong population and especially for school children. Local Chinese students have a higher prevalence of myopia regardless of whether they attend in local or international schools when compared with other ethnic groups. Myopia will bring inconvenience in everyday life and serious myopia is associated with retinal degeneration, peripheral retinal breaks and glaucoma which may lead to permanent vision loss and blindness.

Orthokeratology is a non-surgical means of vision correction which must be administered by registered optometrists. Myopia is a refractive defect of the eye in which collimated light produces image focus in front of the retina. The longer the eyeball length, the higher degree of myopia. Patients who wish to receive ortholeratology must have a thorough eye examination to see if he or she is suitable for the treatment. Optometrist will dispense a pair of specially designed rigid contact lens made from high oxygen permeable material for wearing during sleep time. The lens will modify the corneal shape as well as to correct the focus of the eye in order to correct the wearer's vision. If successful, wearer can have clear vision without using any vision aids for the rest of the day.

In 1997, PolyU's School of Optometry established The Centre for Myopia Research to conduct clinical, genomic and proteomic research using a multi-disciplinary approach, pulling in expertise from all areas of clinical and basic science. Professor Pauline Cho is a pioneer in research on myopic control and has published her findings in Current Eye Research Journal in 2005. She and her team found evidence that orthokeratology may have a potential for controlling the progression of myopia in children, apart from vision correction. To further confirm the potential of orthokeratology, Professor Cho and her team commenced two clinical trials named ROMIO (Retardation Of Myopia In Orthokeratology) and TO-SEE (Toric Orthokeratology-Slowing Eyeball Elongation) in 2008.

The ROMIO study is the first randomized, single masked study in the world to investigate the effectiveness of orthokeratology for myopic control in children. Participants were 77 children aged 7 to 10 years old with myopia not more than 4.00D and were randomly assigned to orthokeratology or spectacle group. At the end of 24 months of the research, the increase in eyeball length in the orthokeratology group is 0.36mm and in whereas that of the spectacle group which is 0.63mm. The results prove that the increase of eyeball length in children wearing orthokeratology lenses was about 43% slower than those wearing spectacles.

In the TO-SEE study, 37 children aged 6 to 12 years old were recruited and to study the potential of orthokeratology in reduction of astigmatism. Myopia of the participants was not more than 4.50D and astigmatism between 1.25D and 3.50D. Professor Cho and her team found that toric design orthokeratology effectively reduced the astigmatism by 79% after one month of lens wear. At the end of 24 months, the eyeball length of the participants was 0.31mm which also showed significance proof on myopic control.

Professor Cho says due to advancement in science and technology, the design and materials of orthokeratology lens were greatly improved. The high oxygen permeable lens with enhanced corneal reshaping potential brings convenience to wearers in daily life. If wearers strictly follow the instructions of the optometrist and have regular check-up, over 60% of their myopia could be reduced after one overnight lens wear and the rest over two to four weeks.

Orthokeratology is a reversible treatment and can be stopped anytime. With the clinically proved results in refractive error correction, myopic control and astigmatism reduction, it represents a safe and effective solution for people with myopia.

Press contact: Ms Carolyn Wong
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences
Tel: (852) 3400 3973
Email: carolyn.wong@polyu.edu.hk

Regina Yu | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.polyu.edu.hk
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>