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Phosphate Sorption Characteristics of European Alpine Soils

15.06.2011
Research on phosphate sorption of alpine soils is limited, but European researchers have provided new data regarding the impact alpine soils have on catchments of alpine lakes.

Soil chemistry plays an important role in the composition of surface waters. In areas with limited human activities, properties of catchment soils directly relate to the exported nutrients to surface waters. Phosphate sorption research is common in agricultural and forest soils, but data from alpine areas are limited.

Scientists from the Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Repbublic, from the Centre for Advanced Studies of Blanes, and from the Forest Sciences Center of Catalonia, have conducted research of the impact European alpine soils have on numerous catchments of alpine lakes.

By comparing phosphate sorption characteristics of soils with different levels of acidification, the scientists determined which soil chemical properties affected phosphate sorption.

The study showed that the sorption of alpine soils from different localities were generally similar, ranging between 9 – 145 mmol kg-1. This data was positively correlated with the sum of concentrations of aluminum and iron oxides.

Aluminum oxide concentration was the most important factor tested, accounting for an average of 67% of the sorption variability from the test sites.

Results also showed that similar concentrations of aluminum and iron oxides are able to more effectively retain phosphate in more acidic areas than in areas with high soil pH. Therefore, different levels of acidification of soils may contribute to lower phosphate concentrations in lakes in more acidified areas, compared to lakes less affected by acidification.

The complete results from this study can be found in the May-June 2011 issue of the Soil Science Society of America Journal.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at https://www.soils.org/publications/sssaj/articles/75/3/862.

Soil Science Society of America Journal, www.soils.org/publications/sssaj, is a peer-reviewed international journal published six times a year by the Soil Science Society of America. Its contents focus on research relating to physics; chemistry; biology and biochemistry; fertility and plant nutrition; genesis, morphology, and classification; water management and conservation; forest, range, and wildland soils; nutrient management and soil and plant analysis; mineralogy; and wetland soils.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive, international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science. It provides information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use.

SSSA supports its members by providing quality research-based publications, educational programs, certifications, and science policy initiatives via a Washington, DC, office. Founded in 1936, SSSA celebrates its 75th Anniversary this year (2011). For more information, visit www.soils.org or follow @SSSA_soils on Twitter.

Sara Uttech | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.agronomy,org

Further reports about: Alpines Steinschaf SSSA Soil Soil Science iron oxide surface water

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