Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Periodontitis Revisited: It’s the Community, Not Single Microorganisms!

06.08.2012
New study published in open access journal PLoS ONE: Community composition of the oral microorganisms influences dental health / detection of just a few oral bacteria is not sufficient to monitor the treatment success of periodontitis patients

There’s a direct correlation between the diversity of your oral microbiome – the up to 700 different species of bacteria that live in your mouth – and the health of your teeth, according to a study from scientists at the University of Münster and Bielefeld University.

Some combination of those bacteria, it’s not clear which ones exactly, are a key component responsible for periodontitis, a disease that weakens the supporting tissues of your teeth and can cause them to loosen and eventually fall out. Periodontitis is one of the most common diseases in the world and half of the people over 40 years old in developed countries have it.

Traditionally the treatment for periodontitis is scaling and root planning, or SRP – a dentist scraping away the plaque from teeth pockets that causes the disease to start. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed as well, though just how well they work is not clear. The goal of the study was to see how bacteria react to treatment. This is the first step toward understanding the true impact treatments are having and eventually developing a prognostic tool to monitor the progression of the disease.

What the team found was that successful treatment, whether from SRP alone or SRP and antibiotics, resulted in a higher diversity of the species of bacteria and their abundance living in the patient’s mouth. Traditionally scientists have tried to monitor the disease by looking at just a few bacteria at a time, which they either grew in petri dishes - an approach dating back to the time of Robert Koch – or detected by molecular means. It’s an approach that study author Dr. Dag Harmsen, a researcher from the Department for Periodontology at the University of Münster, says is ineffective.

“Periodontitis is not caused by individual micro-organisms, you need to look at all the bacteria in the entire oral microbiome and see how the entire population shifts to understand if a treatment is having an effect,” said Harmsen.

Harmsen’s approach of looking at an entire population of organisms is called amplicon metagenomics. It allows researchers to simply sequence the DNA of every organism that is present in a sample and see what the data tells them, rather than approaching the experiment with a thesis that could limit what they can find. These researchers were the first to publish metagenomic research on the Ion PGM™ sequencer, a new sequencing technology that makes metagenomic sequencing faster and more affordable than in the past.

“The biggest challenge with NGS experiments in general is to deal with the huge amount of data generated in the proper way. Here especially it was an endeavor to implement an automated analysis pipeline for such a new technology platform,” explained the first author of the PLoS ONE publication Sebastian Jünemann, a bioinformatician from the Institute for Bioinformatics, Center for Biotechnology, Bielefeld University.

“If the study results are confirmed in further experiments with larger sample size, the detected changes in community profiles and metrics will be a very useful diagnostic prognostic factor for treatment success and certainly be applied soon in routine patient care,“ added Harmsen.

Citation:
Jünemann S, Prior K, Szczepanowski R, Harks I, Ehmke B, Goesmann A, Stoye J, Harmsen D (2012) Bacterial community shift in treated periodontitis patients revealed by Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. PLoS ONE 7(8): e41606.

doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0041606

Contact:
Dr. Thomas Bauer
University of Münster, Medical Faculty
Tel.: 0251 / 83-58937
E-mail: thbauer@uni-muenster.de

Juliane Albrecht | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-muenster.de
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0041606

Further reports about: Ionen PLoS One SRP microorganisms oral microbiome periodontitis species of bacteria

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>