Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Patients who received donated pacemakers survive without complications

13.10.2009
Study of 12 patients in the Philippines shows safety and efficacy of reusing devices

Patients who received refurbished pacemakers donated from Detroit area funeral homes survived without complications from the devices, according to a case series reported by the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center.

The pacemakers were implanted in 12 patients at the University of Philippines- Philippine General Hospital who could not afford advanced cardiac care and were confined to their beds as they waited for a permanent pacemaker.

All donated pacemakers functioned normally at six months, and most importantly there were no device complications such as infections. The study appears online ahead of print in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The argument for pacemaker reuse has been debated for decades. But the idea is gaining ground as U-M cardiology experts report promising results of providing donated pacemakers to underserved nations.

"In light of the widening health care disparity seen between the industrialized world and developing nations, we feel that pacemaker reuse is an ethical obligation to address the medical needs of those who could not afford therapy otherwise," says co-author Timir Baman, M.D., cardiology fellow at the U-M Cardiovascular Center.

Based on surveys showing a majority of heart patients were interested in donating their pacemakers after death, U-M has launched Project My Heart Your Heart.

Project My Heart Your Heart is a joint collaboration between the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, Michigan funeral homes, and World Medical Relief, a Detroit-based non-profit organization that specializes in the delivery of used medical equipment.

"Ongoing research is needed to evaluate the feasibility of regional and potentially nationwide pacemaker donation programs," says co-author Kim Eagle, M.D., director of the U-M Cardiovascular Center.

In recent decades, industrialized nations have seen a drop in deaths from heart attacks and strokes, but those in low- and middle-income nations continue to experience an epidemic of cardiovascular disease.

The prevalence of cardiovascular disease is expected to increase 137 percent between 1990 and 2020 for those living in low- and middle- income countries, authors write. It's estimated that as many as 1 million people worldwide die annually from slow heart rates.

"Many of these countries lack the financial resources to address this epidemic of cardiovascular disease," says co-author Hakan Oral, M.D., director of electrophysiology at the U-M cardiovascular center. "As a result, resources are often directed away from high-cost treatment strategies, such as implantable cardiac rhythmn management devices."

Pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices are implanted to regulate an irregular or slow heart beat, or act as an insurance policy by automatically shocking the heart back to a normal rhythm. They can last up to 10 years and cost $10,000 to $50,000.

Only pacemakers with 70 percent battery life were included in the study and informed consent was obtained from all patients' families in order to remove and donate the pacemakers after death. A total of 50 pacemakers were donated by funeral homes to WMR. Of them, 12 with adequate battery life were implanted in poor patients at Philippine General Hospital in Manila.

U-M is exploring partnerships with the Philippine General, Vietnam Heart Institute in Hanoi, and Komfo Medical Center in Ghana, which is in the process of developing an arrhythmia therapy program, for allocation of used pacemakers. The international hospitals have had on-site reviews for quality and clinical excellence by U-M cardiology experts.

In the next phase, the U-M Cardiovascular Center will seek approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to embark on a large scale clinical trial to show that pacemaker reuse is safe and effective.

Authors: Timir S. Baman, M.D.; Al Romero, M.D.; James N. Kilpatrick, M.D.; Joshua Romero, BA; David C. Lange, M.D.; Eric O. Sison, M.D.; Rogelio V. Tangco, M.D.; Nelson S. Abelardo, M.D.; George Samson, M.D.; Rita Grezlik; Edward B. Goldman, J.D.; Hakan Oral, M.D., and Kim Eagle, M.D.

Funding: Hewlett Foundation, Mardigan Foundation, U-M Cardiovascular Center

Resources:
U-M Cardiovascular Center http://www.med.umich.edu/cvc/
Project My Heart Your Heart http://www.med.umich.edu/myheartyourheart/

Shantell M. Kirkendoll | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.umich.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>