Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mechanomyography to be accurate in detecting nerves during minimally invasive spine surgery

16.03.2010
An electronic device is an accurate technique for locating and avoiding nerves during spinal procedures, suggests a study by Henry Ford Hospital researchers.

The issue becomes important for patients as the demand for minimally invasive surgical techniques continues to grow, so does the need for effective methods for monitoring the location of nerves during surgery to avoid damage to them.

Mechanomyography (MMG) systems function by measuring the mechanical response of muscle following nerve stimulation, compared to traditional techniques that monitor the electrical response of muscle using electromyography (EMG). EMG systems are widely used as intraoperative tools to help surgeons avoid nerve injury. MMG has been widely used in laboratory settings to study things such as muscle fatigue, however up until now it has not been applied as an intraoperative tool for locating nerves.

"We felt there was a safer and faster way to intra-operatively monitor the location of nerves and we wanted to test this theory by directly comparing MMG to EMG," says Stephen Bartol, MD, orthopedic spine surgeon at Henry Ford Hospital. "We found MMG to be extremely effective for detecting the presence of nerves during minimally invasive surgical procedures when the nerves could not be directly visualized."

Dr. Bartol presented results from the study this week at the Tenth Annual Scientific Conference of the Canadian Spine Society in Alberta.

According to the National Institutes of Health, in a three-month period, about one-fourth of U.S. adults experience at least one day of back pain. It is one of the most common medical issues affecting Americans.

During minimally invasive spine surgery, a common treatment for chronic back pain, a small electrical signal is sometimes used to stimulate nerves and detect responses so that nerves are not damaged during surgery.

"Because conventional EMG systems monitor for subtle changes in muscle electrical activity, there is the potential for electrical interference. By using an MMG system, we are not worried about electrical interference since the response to electrical stimulation is measured through mechanical sensors instead," says Dr. Bartol.

In an animal model, Dr. Bartol and his colleagues measured the EMG and MMG responses to electrical current.

"We found that the MMG system had a faster response, indicating a higher sensitivity for detection of nerves at a lower threshold," says Dr. Bartol.

In another study, also presented at the conference, Dr. Bartol took a look at how the muscle response to electrical stimulus varies with the distance of the nerve from the source of the stimulus.

"We need to know exactly how far away we are from the nerve. Working with different levels of current, we were able to establish a relationship between the current and distance, allowing the surgeon to determine precisely how far a nerve is from the stimulus probe," says Dr. Bartol.

They found MMG detected the presence of a nerve on average 1.2 seconds earlier than EMG, using approximately half the amount of stimulating current. Since electrical resistance is highly variable, depending on the conducting tissue, EMG monitoring systems may utilize currents as high as 200 mA. The MMG system in this study has a maximum current output of 6 mA, nearly 35 times less than comparable EMG systems.

"We found mechanomyography to be a more sensitive indicator for locating nerves," says Dr. Bartol. "We can, without looking, know within a millimeter or two where we are in relation to the nerve. By utilizing a system that requires less electrical current, we may be able to further decrease the risk of injury to our patients."

Dr. Bartol explains that further investigation is needed in human trials.

Industry funding for both studies was received from Innovative Surgical Solutions, LLC, based in Royal Oak, MI.

Maria Seyrig | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.hfhs.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>