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Major study shows significant quality of life benefits from HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

22.08.2008
A major international study of the effects of HRT use on quality of life has shown that HRT use can significantly improve wellbeing in women with menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and night sweats.

The results of the WISDOM study will be published on BMJ.com on Friday 22 August 2008 (note: this BMJ article is embargoed until 00.01 UK time, Friday 22nd August 2008). This study looked at health-related quality of life in 5692 health women aged 50-69 in the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

The International Menopause Society notes that the study found that about 3 out of 4 women who complained of night sweats and hot flushes, found that these symptoms had vanished after a year of HRT use. Even in women who were well past menopause and did not suffer hot flushes, there was a noted improvement in sleep, sexuality and joint pain as a result of HRT use.

Speaking for the International Menopause Society, Professor Amos Pines (Tel Aviv, Israel) said:

“This study shows just how effective hormone therapy can be, in alleviating hot flushes and sleep disturbances and in generally improving other components of quality of life and wellbeing.

Taking everything into account, latest data shows that hormone therapy in healthy women during the early postmenopausal period is really pretty safe. Nowadays most specialists working with the menopause consider that the many women who are experiencing a poor quality of life because of the menopause need to be able to decide themselves, in consultation with their doctor, about taking HRT. This study shows the benefits of HRT use, and adds even more weight to this conclusion”.

Dr David Sturdee (Solihull, UK), President of the International Menopause Society said:

“This is a significant study, which supports our views on HRT. It shows that HRT can offer real benefits to most women experiencing menopausal symptoms. Our advice remains the same; each woman is an individual, and she needs to discuss what’s right for her with her doctor, in the light of her medical history. This study reinforces the benefits of appropriate use ”.

The International Menopause Society (IMS) is the major international body working with menopause-related medicine. The IMS’s view is that HRT use can benefit women experiencing symptoms associated with the menopause, for example hot flushes, night sweats, aching joints and muscles, insomnia, and vaginal dryness. Evidence shows that HRT use is generally safe for healthy women going through the menopause. Health risks of HRT use rise slightly after the age of around 59. However, each woman needs to discuss her own medical circumstances with her doctor before deciding on HRT use.

The above is a summary (and of necessity, it is simplified), but the IMS’s full guidance can be seen at: http://www.imsociety.org/

Thomas Parkhill | alfa
Further information:
http://www.imsociety.org

Further reports about: HRT Hormon Menopause hormone therapy hot flushes night sweats postmenopausal period

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