Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Long-term study shows epilepsy surgery improves seizure control and quality of life

07.02.2012
Seizures eliminated in 48 percent of patients and QOL improved in 80 percent of patients according to 26-year follow-up

While epilepsy surgery is a safe and effective intervention for seizure control, medical therapy remains the more prominent treatment option for those with epilepsy.

However, a new 26-year study reveals that following epilepsy surgery, nearly half of participants were free of disabling seizures and 80% reported better quality of life than before surgery. Findings from this study—the largest long-term study to date—are now available in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE).

More than 50 million individuals worldwide suffer from seizures caused by epilepsy according to a 2001 report by the World Health Organization (WHO). Medical evidence shows that compared with the general population, epilepsy patients have significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher rates of co-morbidites, and lower rates of employment, marriage, and education levels. Previous studies found that while a majority of those with epilepsy do respond to antiepileptic drugs, over 30% patients are refractory to medical therapy.

"In cases where medical therapy fails to control seizures, epilepsy surgery is a safe and effective treatment option," explains lead author Dr. Matthew Smyth with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. "Despite the increase in the number of epilepsy surgeries performed, and reports in the medical literature of the success of surgery relative to medication, it remains an underutilized therapy for seizure control." A 2001 study estimated that less than 0.1% of the more than 4 million people worldwide who could benefit from epilepsy surgery actually receive the intervention.

To advance understanding of long-term seizure control rates, researchers analyzed data of seizure and quality of life outcomes for 361 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery between 1967 and 1990; Dr. Sidney Goldring, a prominent neurosurgeon and pioneer of epilepsy surgery, performed the procedures. Patients were then surveyed to assess seizure control and quality of life.

Of the 361 patients, 117 completed follow-up interviews for the study and 48% were determined to be free of disabling seizures. On a survey assessing the quality of life for those with epilepsy, 80% of patients reported their overall quality life was better than before the surgery. As the authors expected, surgical complications and mortality following surgery declined over the long-term. No statistically significant association between postoperative complications and long-term seizure control or quality of life outcomes was observed.

"Our findings demonstrate that the benefits of epilepsy surgery are sustained over long time periods," concludes Dr. Smyth. "Increased use of surgical intervention offers patients with epilepsy the possibility of long-term seizure control and improved quality of life."

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact healthnews@wiley.com.

Full citation:"Impact of Epilepsy Surgery on Seizure Control and Quality of Life: A 26-year Follow-up Study." Hussan S. Mohammed, Christian B. Kaufman, David D. Limbrick, Karen Steger-May, Robert L. Grubb Jr., Steven M. Rothman, Judy Weisenberg, Rebecca Munro, Matthew D. Smyth. Epilepsia; February 7, 2012 (DOI:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03398.x).

URL Upon publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03398.x.
Author contact:To arrange an interview with Dr. Smyth, please contact Jackie Ferman with Washington University at jferman@bjc.org.

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world's preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy. For information about ILAE, please visit http://www.ilae.org/.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit http://www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (http://www.wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world's most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

Dawn Peters | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>