Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Kessler Foundation MS study documents negative effect of warmer weather on cognitive performance

14.03.2012
MS researchers find decline in cognitive performance for people with multiple sclerosis as outdoor temperatures rise

Results have implications for patients and researchers

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown for the first time that outdoor temperature significantly affects cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis (MS). While it is recognized that disease activity increases during warmer months, this is the first study to document that cognition also fluctuates. During warmer outdoor temperatures patients with MS performed worse on tasks involving processing speed and memory. An estimated 50 to 65% of people with MS experience problems with thinking, learning and remembering that can be disabling.

“Warmer outdoor temperature is associated with worse cognitive status in MS,” was published online ahead of print by Neurology. An accompanying editorial, “MS and heat: The smoke and the fire,” discusses the study’s contributions to understanding MS. According to the results, cognitive performance may be a more sensitive indicator of subclinical disease activity than traditional assessments.

In the study, which spanned the calendar year, 40 individuals with MS and 40 people without MS underwent cognitive assessment of memory and processing speed. People with MS scored 70 percent higher on cooler days; no association was found for individuals without MS. Funding was provided by the National MS Society and the NIH.

According to Victoria M. Leavitt, Ph.D., research scientist, and the study’s principal investigator, these findings have implications for patients, clinicians and researchers. “This information is relevant to making life decisions and choosing therapies and evaluating their effects,” said Dr. Leavitt. “Outdoor temperatures may be an important consideration when designing and conducting clinical trials, many of which span six months.” For example, taking baseline measurements during warmer months could inflate positive findings. The study’s co-investigators are James F. Sumowski, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Nancy Chiaravalloti, Ph.D., Director of Neuropsychology & Neuroscience Research, and John DeLuca, Ph.D., VP for Research.

Kessler Foundation is nationally and internationally known for cognitive rehabilitation research in MS and traumatic brain injury. Its neuroscience research supports the theory of cognitive reserve, ie, people with MS who lead intellectually enriching lives are less likely to experience cognitive decline. A recent publication documented changes in brain activity on fMRI associated with effective memory retraining in people with MS.

About Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation, the largest public charity in the field of disability, conducts rehabilitation research in mobility and cognition that advances the care of people with multiple sclerosis, brain injury, stroke and spinal cord injury. Kessler Foundation Program Center fosters new approaches to the persistently high rates of unemployment among people disabled by injury or disease. Find us at KesslerFoundation.org and on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Carolann Murphy, PA; 973.324.8382; CMurphy@KesslerFoundation.org

Lauren Scrivo, 973.324.8384/973.768.6583 (cell); LScrivo@KesslerFoundation.org

Carolann Murphy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.kesslerfoundation.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Devils Hole: Ancient Traces of Climate History

24.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences

A CLOUD of possibilities: Finding new therapies by combining drugs

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>