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Job Seekers: How Do You Rate with Employers?

21.02.2011
Finding employment can be a daunting task. Millions of college graduates, new to the professional work force, face this challenge every year after receiving their degrees.

Many have sacrificed and toiled for perfect grades, worked at internships to prepare for careers, and filled their schedules with university affiliated clubs and activities. The belief that these attributes will enhance a resume and impress an employer is widespread, but does it really reflect what employers seek in a new hire?

To answer this question, researchers at Oklahoma State University conducted a study of more than 450 college graduate employers. Examining not only what attributes employers look for but also the mechanisms with which employers measure these attributes, researchers we able to determine an attribute ranking system based on career path. For example, the top three qualities employers value in the agribusiness industry are communication skills, critical thinking skills, and writing skills.

Employers were asked which signals best illustrate the five attributes being tested: number crunching ability, character, communication skills, problem solving skills, and ability to work well with others. Seventeen signals were listed including grades, major, coursework, and others. However, employers were only to rate five signals for every attribute.

Overall, internships and majors related to the job were highly rated signals, as well as foreign language skills and interviewing skills. While excellent grades were not ranked as high as other skills and experiences, they are still important.

“Each student should strategically acquire accomplishments and qualifications which are both valued by employers and consistent with the student’s preferences, goals, and talents,” says Bailey Norwood, one of the study’s authors.

Norwood suggests students should tailor their career choices to their personal strengths and aspirations. Grades, extracurricular activities, leadership positions, internships, and awards speak for an individual as a whole. Also, Norwood advises that interview skills are an invaluable asset.

However, researchers at Oklahoma State remind students and graduates that the study is not infallible.

According to Norwood, “It is important not to allow summaries of survey statistics obscure the fact that each employer is different, and there is no one perfect college graduate.”

The full study is published in the January – February 2011 issue of the Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at www.jnrlse.org/view/2011/e09-0040.pdf. After 30 days it will be available at the Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education website, www.jnrlse.org. Go to www.jnrlse.org/issues/ (Click on the Year, "View Article List," and scroll down to article abstract).

Today's educators are looking to the Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education, http://www.jnrlse.org, for the latest teaching techniques in the life sciences, natural resources, and agriculture. The journal is continuously updated online during the year and one hard copy is published in December by the American Society of Agronomy.

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) www.agronomy.org, is a scientific society helping its 8,000+ members advance the disciplines and practices of agronomy by supporting professional growth and science policy initiatives, and by providing quality, research-based publications and a variety of member services.

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.agronomy.org

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