Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Impact of whooping cough vaccination revealed

23.04.2014

Comprehensive study shows effect of vaccination on spread and diversification of Bordetella pertussis

The most comprehensive study to date of the family of bacteria that causes whooping cough points to more effective vaccine strategies and reveals surprising findings about the bacteria's origin and evolution. The new results could alter public health strategies to control this respiratory disease, which kills 195,000 children worldwide each year.

Genomic analysis of 343 strains of the Bordetella pertussis bacteria from around the world collected over the last 100 years illustrates how vaccination has shaped its evolution. Since its introduction across the globe between 1940 and 1960, vaccination has dramatically reduced rates of infection and loss of life from whooping cough. However, strategies used to date have not completely eradicated strains of the bacteria, instead leading to an increase in diversity.

"The scale of this study and the detailed family history of B. pertussis we are able to draw from it illustrate the journey this bacterium has taken since its emergence," says Dr Simon Harris, a first author at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "By seeing how an organism escapes vaccination we can build better strategies to control and eradicate it."

While researchers suspect that the diversity may be the result of lineages of the bacteria persisting in unvaccinated populations, resurgence of B. pertussis has also been observed between 2010 and 2012 in highly vaccinated populations such as Australia, the Netherlands, the UK and the USA. One reason could be the widespread switch to the use of acellular vaccines, which, though better tolerated than the original whole-cell vaccines, tend to produce more rapidly-waning immunity.

"To stem the rise of whooping cough without returning to whole-cell vaccines, which can be reactogenic, we need to employ strategic vaccination," says Dr Marieke Bart, a first author from the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, the Netherlands. "This could include vaccinating mothers in pregnancy so babies are born with some level of protection and cocooning a newborn by vaccinating adults around it. In the long run, however, we need better pertussis vaccines."

As well as suggesting strategies for control in the future, the study revealed new findings about B. pertussis' past. Genetic analysis of the strains shows that whooping cough emerged and spread rapidly in humans in the late Middle Ages, around 500 years ago, not in the Neolithic period more than 10,000 years ago, as previously thought.

This finding resolves a puzzle that had troubled scientists for some time: despite characteristic symptoms and a high rate of mortality in unvaccinated children, records of whooping cough are entirely absent from ancient European literature. This new analysis, which places the emergence and rapid global spread of the infection in the human population within the last 500 years, is consistent with historical records that first identify the disease in Paris in 1578. The only earlier reference to a disease with similar symptoms has been found in a Korean medical textbook from the 15th Century.

"Over the past five years or so it has become clear that we have got our dating in bacteriology wrong," says Professor Julian Parkhill, a senior group leader at the Sanger Institute and a senior author of the study. "The mutation rate we were working with is probably two orders of magnitude out, so we thought the last common ancestor of these modern B. pertussis strains was tens of thousands of years old when, in fact, it is much younger than that."

###

Notes to Editors

Publication Details

Marieke J Bart et al (2014) Global population structure and evolution of Bordetella pertussis and their relationship with vaccination. mBio DOI:10.1128/mBio.01074-14

Funding

This work was supported by the Wellcome Trust (grant number 098051), the RIVM (SOR project S/230446/01/BV), and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.

Participating Centres

A full list of participating centres can be found on the paper.

Selected Websites

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world's leading genome centres. Through its ability to conduct research at scale, it is able to engage in bold and long-term exploratory projects that are designed to influence and empower medical science globally. Institute research findings, generated through its own research programmes and through its leading role in international consortia, are being used to develop new diagnostics and treatments for human disease.
http://www.sanger.ac.uk

The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. We support the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. Our breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. We are independent of both political and commercial interests.
http://www.wellcome.ac.uk

Contact details

Don Powell Media Manager
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK
Tel +44 (0)1223 496 928
Mobile +44 (0)7753 7753 97
Email press.office@sanger.ac.uk

Mary Clarke | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Bordetella pertussis bacteria populations strains strategies symptoms vaccination vaccines

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientist invents way to trigger artificial photosynthesis to clean air

26.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoli

26.04.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

SwRI-led team discovers lull in Mars' giant impact history

26.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>