Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Getting out of the house after stroke

12.10.2010
People who have become housebound after having a stroke are being invited to take part in a major new study that could help to put them back on the road to independence.

Researchers at The University of Nottingham are leading a national research project that will look at whether a new way of offering rehabilitation therapy could assist stroke patients who are keen to leave the house more but may have lost the confidence to step out on their own.

Funded with £10 million from the National Institute for Health Research (HIHR), the study will involve providing some volunteer patients with a targeted rehabilitation approach and goal-based outdoor mobility programme in an attempt to improve their physical capabilities and boost their belief in their own abilities. Their achievements will then be compared to other volunteer patients who have not received the intervention to discover how they fared in comparison.

Dr Pip Logan in the University’s Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing, who is leading the study, said: “Looking at practical barriers which may be preventing people from leaving the house, such as a lack of adequate handrails on steps and garden paths, is of course very valid.

“However, it is often the psychological barriers which are the toughest to overcome. For someone who has driven all their life up until their stroke, tackling public transport can seem extremely daunting. Similarly, someone left with cognitive issues following stroke, such as memory loss or aphasia, may worry about their ability to communicate effectively while out and about.

“We are hoping that by offering a more targeted approach to therapy we can help them to develop their mobility abilities and coping strategies that will allow them get about more and become independent people once again.”

The research follows a pilot study undertaken by the team in 2004 which found that, despite rehabilitation, 42 per cent of people with a stroke wanted to get out of their house more. The randomised controlled trial offered a travel promotion programme by an occupational therapist to half of the volunteers on the study. It provided them with bespoke information, prescribing remedial exercises and equipment as needed and supporting them in their return to driving or using public transport. At the end of the four month trial, this group were twice as likely to get out and about as those who had not received this service.

The researchers are now keen to recruit more than 150 stroke patients from across Nottinghamshire to take part in the trial and have been joining forces with local authorities, health agencies and a national charity to find suitable volunteers.

Local GPs, Nottingham City Council, the Stroke Association and the NHS Nottinghamshire County primary care trust’s stroke register are playing their part in identifying patients who may have fallen through the net. Support from NHS Nottingham City primary care trust and Nottinghamshire County NHS Trust will come in the form of occupational therapist Lorraine Lancaster, who will spend four days a week on the project, travelling around Nottinghamshire visiting patients in the intervention group that will be receiving the bespoke therapy intervention.

Lorraine works as an occupational therapist with the Nottingham City Community Stroke team. This team provides rehabilitation and mid to long term support, mostly at home, for people who have had a stroke.

Lorraine said: “Our multi disciplinary team has specialist knowledge and experience of stroke and stroke related issues. It is important to work with patients, families and carers to develop a rehabilitation programme in order to meet their individual needs. Patients in this research study build on the work we have achieved by specifically focusing on outdoor mobility. We welcome any research that provides robust evidence that a specific intervention is likely to benefit stroke survivors.”

As well as Nottingham, 11 other places in the UK are taking part.

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/News/pressreleases/2010/October/poststroke.aspx

Further reports about: NHS Nottingham Nottinghamshire primary care public transport stroke patients

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>