Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Growth defects in cystic fibrosis may start before birth

10.11.2010
A new study using a pig model of cystic fibrosis (CF) suggests that low levels of a growth promoting hormone at or before birth may contribute to growth defects in patients with CF.

The study, led by University of Iowa researchers and published online the week of Nov. 8 in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help predict the severity of the disease in patients and may lead to new therapies for growth defects in people with CF.

Growth defects are common in people with CF and have been blamed, in part, on low levels of the growth-promoting hormone called insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Traditionally, the malnutrition and lung inflammation that accompany CF have been blamed for the decreased levels of IGF1. However, even patients who are relatively healthy often do not reach their full growth potential, and newborns with CF often are smaller at birth than healthy babies.

To investigate the relationship between neonatal IGF1 levels and growth patterns in CF, the research team studied newborn pigs with a CF-causing gene mutation. This animal model, which was generated by the UI researchers and colleagues at the University of Missouri in 2008, has many of the same symptoms and complications that are seen in humans with CF.

"By examining IGF1 at this time point, we eliminated consequences of lung inflammation, which is absent at birth, and malnutrition, because nutrition in utero is provided by the mother," explained Leah Reznikov, Ph.D., UI postdoctoral fellow in internal medicine and co-first author of the study. "We found that IGF1 levels were significantly reduced at birth in CF newborn pigs."

In addition, the UI researchers found that newborn CF pigs had shorter, smaller bones than pigs without CF suggesting that decreased IGF1 levels are associated with the growth defects, and that IGF1 levels may be reduced even before the pigs are born.

These findings led Reznikov and colleagues, including co-first author Mark Rogan, M.D., a former UI postdoctoral fellow in internal medicine, to examine levels of IGF1 in newborn humans with CF.

By testing blood samples collected through the Iowa Neonatal Metabolic Screening Program and the Iowa Department of Public Health, the researchers found that infants with CF have reduced IGF1 levels compared to healthy infants.

"Collectively, these findings suggest that IGF1 deficits begin very early in the course of CF disease and reductions in IGF1 may, in part, explain growth defects observed at birth in infants with CF," Reznikov said. "The findings also imply that IGF1 may serve as a potential biomarker of the disease and may be useful in prognostication, care and treatment of people with CF."

Patients with CF currently receive replacement pancreatic enzymes and insulin supplementation to counteract effects of CF. One possibility raised by the new findings is that IGF1 supplementation, beginning in infancy, might also be beneficial for growth in patients with CF. However, Reznikov cautioned that more testing is needed before this approach could be tested in humans.

"We would like to increase the sample size in our human studies and examine other parameters to better understand the relationship among CF, IGF1 and growth defects," she said."

If these test results are positive, Reznikov noted that the CF pigs would provide an excellent preclinical system to test whether IGF1 supplementation would be beneficial early in CF.

In addition to Reznikov and Rogan, the research team included Michael Welsh, M.D., UI professor of internal medicine and molecular physiology and biophysics and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and David Stoltz, M.D., Ph.D., UI assistant professor of internal medicine. UI researchers Alejandro Pezzulo; Nicholas Gansemer; Joseph Zabner; Douglas Fredericks; and Paul McCray Jr.; and University of Missouri researchers Melissa Samuel and Randall Prather also contributed to the study.

The research was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

STORY SOURCE: University of Iowa Health Care Media Relations, 200 Hawkins Drive, Room W319 GH, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1009

MEDIA CONTACT: Jennifer Brown, 319-356-7124, jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu

Jennifer Brown | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uiowa.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their minds
28.11.2017 | University of Chicago Medical Center

nachricht The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
17.11.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>