Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

German Research Foundation to fund globally unique twin study on social inequality

07.12.2012
Interdisciplinary study by Bielefeld and Saarland Universities

Much celebration at the universities in Bielefeld and Saarbrücken. The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved funding for a long-term research project by Professors Dr. Martin Diewald and Dr. Rainer Riemann from Bielefeld University and Dr. Frank Spinath from Saarland University.

They are studying the development of social inequalities – for the example of 4,000 pairs of twins living in Germany. The name of the study is ‘Twinlife’. The DFG announced its decision today (7 December), and will be providing more than four million Euros of funding for the first three years.

In a longitudinal study, which should stretch over twelve years, the researchers will study the development of social inequalities across the life span. The mechanisms contributing to social inequalities will be studied in an interdisciplinary way. This will combine both psychological and sociological research traditions with the methods of behavioural genetics. ‘We shall not just look at the social mechanisms, but also at the genetic differences between individuals, and focus particularly on the interaction between genetic and social influences,’ Riemann explains. ‘In addition, we shall focus on the psychological processes that mediate between genes and the environment.’

Social inequality will be examined in five central life domains. These are the development of abilities and academic success, participation on the labour market, social capital and integration into social networks, social and political participation as well as the development of deviant behaviour and socio-emotional problems. Spinath describes the study’s approach: ‘It will be necessary to recruit a representative sample of 4,000 pairs of twins living in Germany for the funded study. Then, the twins and their parents, any brothers and sisters of the twins, and for older twins, also their partners will be surveyed.’ Short tests will be carried out and questionnaires will be completed in home visits and telephone surveys. The study covers a broad age range extending from 5-year-old children to 31-year-old adults.

The resulting dataset will be made available to the international community of researchers as a ‘common good’. ‘This dataset will contain high-quality information in a form that has not been available in any other study up to now. The longitudinal and behavioural-genetic analyses will be supplemented by our own focus of analyses on a theory-guided examination of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors over time,’ is how Diewald summarizes their plans.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Martin Diewald, Bielefeld University
Faculty of Sociology
Telephone: +49 521 106-4309; or over the Press Office: +49 521 106-4170
Email: martin.diewald@uni-bielefeld.de (over email at the weekend)

Prof. Dr. Rainer Riemann, Bielefeld University
Faculty of Psychology and Sports Science/Psychology Department
Telephone: +49 521 106-4529; or over the Press Office: +49 521 106-4170
Email: Rainer.Riemann@uni-bielefeld.de (over email at the weekend)

Prof. Dr. Frank M. Spinath, Saarland University
FR5.3 Psychology
Telephone: +49 681 302 64079
Email: f.spinath@mx.uni-saarland.de

Ingo Lohuis | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-saarland.de

Further reports about: DFG Gates Foundation German language social inequalities

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>