Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraunhofer IAO launches "Kopfarbeit Index KAI"

09.10.2013
What constitutes attractive work for students and our high-potential employees?

How do the students of today want to work tomorrow? Fraunhofer IAO has been using its “Kopfarbeit-Index KAI®” to find out. Since September, students have been invited to define their ideal working conditions by completing an online questionnaire.

By joining the KAI working group, companies can find out exactly what their top performers value most at work, and discover which working conditions appeal to student groups they are looking to target.

If companies want to score points when competing for the best intellectual talent, they must ask themselves what it is that makes a position attractive to future top performers. What conditions do today’s students want for their future employment? What is the present working situation for the thinkers and knowledge workers that companies already employ – and how would they actually like to work?

Fraunhofer IAO developed the “Kopfarbeit-Index KAI®” to answer these questions. The project is designed to elicit the specific wishes of students and top performers when it comes to their dream jobs.

What’s novel about KAI is that its questions target the attractiveness of individual positions rather than seeking to question the attractiveness of a company. In so doing the focus is not on company culture or the social benefits a company offers, but on the working conditions associated with a particular function. What challenges are encountered on a daily basis? Does the job entail working on many tasks simultaneously? Is it possible or even obligatory for employees to commute between several places of work?

All the information gathered in the survey helps paint a detailed picture of which activities are attractive to which students and knowledge workers, and signposts how employers can specifically tailor work to make it more attractive, both for new talents and for today’s top performers.

Companies seeking to strengthen their recruitment process or improve staff loyalty are invited to join the KAI working group. Members are assured feedback from the specific group of students they wish to target, and can make use of Fraunhofer IAO’s expertise and services when surveying their own knowledge workers. Within the working group, members have the opportunity to profit from exchanging ideas with other companies, and benefit from being constantly updated with the latest survey results as they come in. Furthermore, members can post job profiles for positions within their own organization on the KAI® website and catch the attention of students looking for the sort of challenges they offer.

Membership is open to any organization that employs thinkers or knowledge workers, including administrative departments, non-profit organizations, and associations. It is possible to join at any time. The first set of job profiles will appear online from December 2013 onwards.

Contact:
Gabriele Korge
Business Performance Management
Fraunhofer IAO
Nobelstraße 12
70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Phone: +49 711 970-2261
Email: gabriele.korge@iao.fraunhofer.de

Juliane Segedi | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.kai.iao.fraunhofer.de/
http://www.iao.fraunhofer.de/lang-en/business-areas/corporate-development-work-design/1071-fraunhofer-iao-launches-kopfarbeit-index-kai

Further reports about: IAO Kopfarbeit-Index KAI® working conditions

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>