Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fibrin-Derived Peptide FX06 Reduces Cardiac Reperfusion Injury

03.09.2008
ESC Congress 2008 - Hot Line III

Data presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress demonstrates the effectiveness of a peptide called FX06 in preventing cardiac damage resulting from treatment following a heart attack. While reperfusion is well established as a standard of care, it paradoxically causes additional damage to heart muscle in patients surviving from these attacks - a phenomenon termed “reperfusion injury”. FX06 is a novel compound intended to prevent that damage.

Professor Dan Atar, the Coordinating Investigator of the F.I.R.E. (FX06 In ischemia and REperfusion) trial, a Phase II clinical study of FX06, will present the results of the trial at: 12-noon on September 2nd in the Hot Line III Session at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich, Germany.

“Re-establishment of blood flow, either by catheter-based balloon-intervention (PCI) or by thrombolysis, is necessary and life-saving in the treatment of acute myocardial infarctions. However, such interventions can lead to further damage to the heart muscle due to blood vessel dysfunction and inflammation,” said Dan Atar, Professor of Cardiology at the Aker University Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway. “Based on the F.I.R.E. results, FX06 has been shown to reduce damage to the heart muscle by inhibiting inflammation and protecting vascular function. We predict that FX06 may become a novel treatment for STEMI patients undergoing PCI, representing a major advance in acute cardiac care.”

The Phase II clinical trial of FX06 (F.I.R.E. study) was completed in March 2008, with data indicating a statistically significant reduction in myocardial necrosis following intravenous application of FX06 concurrent with reperfusion. FX06 is a peptide that binds to VE-cadherin, a target on the surfaces of endothelial cells, which form the inner cell layer of blood vessels, thereby preserving blood vessel function. This leads to reduced inflammation, reduced oedema and reduced infarct sizes.

About the study:

The F.I.R.E. (FX06 In Ischemia and REperfusion) trial was conducted between October 2006 and March 2008 as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 234 patients from 26 leading centres of interventional cardiology in Europe. The study evaluated infarct size in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). FX06 was administered intravenously to patients during reperfusion treatment, and the effect on heart muscle preservation was then assessed using the most advanced imaging technology: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). The primary endpoint was reduction in infarct size at five days after myocardial infarction.

Results showed that at 5 days post-PCI, the necrotic zone of the infarct was significantly reduced by 58% and the total affected zone of the left ventricle was reduced by 21%. This was accompanied by a reduction in markers of heart muscle cell necrosis. After 4 months, the resulting scar mass was reduced by 37%, suggesting that a reduction of reperfusion injury indeed may lead to decrease in scar tissue formation. Major adverse cardiac events in the FX06 group were also lower compared to the placebo group, which may indicate an effect of the drug on adverse patient outcome after an infarction.

Jacqueline Partarrieu | alfa
Further information:
http://www.escardio.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>