Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

More Europeans Likely To Suffer From Ragweed Allergy

09.02.2009
A pan-European study organised by GA²LEN, the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, tested more than 2000 patients to ragweed allergy in 10 European countries (1). Results published this week on the Allergy journal website (2) show an unexpected extension of allergic sensitisation to ragweed across Europe (3).

The study indicates that more and more Europeans are likely to suffer from ragweed allergy or already have an allergy to ragweed. Ragweed is the main cause of allergic rhinitis in North America but, until now, very few European regions were affected.

“The prevalence of ragweed sensitisation is clearly above 2.5%, the currently accepted threshold for ‘high prevalence’,” said Prof. Zuberbier, from the Charité University of Medicine in Berlin, who led the study. “The study highlights the spreading of ambrosia pollen and the dissemination of the plant throughout Europe. If we consider the apparent climate change, further evolutions in regional vegetation can be expected. GA²LEN therefore calls for a pan-European surveillance system to carefully monitor trends in sensitisation patterns which might allow coordinated counter-measures.”

In the study, a positive reaction to the skin-prick-test shows that the patient is sensitised to ragweed allergens. Sensitised people are more likely to develop allergic reaction to ragweed at some point of their lives.

Results confirmed Hungary to be the most affected country in Europe with close to 58-60% of sensitised people. Ragweed has spread in Hungary since the beginning of the nineteenth century, with a rapid extension in the early 1990s.

The study reveals an unexpectively high prevalence in Central-Western European countries and Denmark:

- 14% of the people tested in the three German research centres reacted positively to the skin prick test;

- 15% in the Netherlands;

- close to 20% in Denmark.

The lowest rates were observed in Italy and Finland, the latter being the only country to show a rate inferior to the threshold: 2.4% of the people tested during the study were sensitised.

1. The GA²LEN Skin-Prick-Test study involved 3000 patients from 17 research centres in 14 countries. Sensitisation to 18 indoor and outdoor allergens was assessed following a standard, comparable protocol for skin-prick-testing. Allergens include cat hair, indoor fungus, house dust mite, trees and plants pollens. Ambrosia was tested on more than 2000 people in 10 countries: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland and Portugal.

2. Allergy is the official journal of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. It is an international journal including original research in the field, reviews of selected subjects of interest to the allergologist and immunologist and comments on topical aspects contemporary methodology. www.blackwellpublishing.com/ALL

3. Ragweed sensitization in Europe – GA²LEN study suggests increasing prevalence. Allergy 2009, In Press, DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.01975.x

4. Pictures of ragweed and skin-prick-testing are available upon request (noelie.auvergne@ga2len.net).

Noélie Auvergne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ga2len.net

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

20.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>