Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Estrogen and Progestin Hormone Therapies in Post-Menopausal Women Increase the Chances of Breast Cancer Metastasis

07.05.2010
After menopause, 6 to 10 million women take hormone therapies, which are often a combination of estrogen and progestin, to replace hormones lost from inactive ovaries.

Progestin is a hormone that is used to counteract the potentially negative effects of estrogen therapy on the uterus. In studies sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, evidence has been found that estrogen and progestin in hormone therapies increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Now, a University of Missouri study has found that progestins can also increase the chance of the cancer metastasizing, or spreading to the lymph nodes.

“In our study, we found that progestins increase the number of blood vessels that are responsible for transporting existing cancer cells,” said Salman Hyder, the Zalk Endowed Professor in Tumor Angiogenesis and professor of biomedical sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. “The more the blood vessels increase, the higher the chance of cancer cell metastasizing. Progestins could even be more harmful to women who have functionally abnormal p53, a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor. In the absence of p53, progestins increase the release of a protein from tumor cells that allows formation of new blood vessels within tumors.”

In the study, researchers compared the effects of several types of commonly used progestins on breast cancer tumors in an animal model. Researchers found that all types of progestin tested act in the same way and increased the risk of metastasis. Also, results showed that estrogen and progestin acted the same way whether taken together or separately. Although Hyder said that the study was independent of whether or not the ovaries were intact, it’s still unclear whether progestins have the same effects in pre-menopausal women.

“Especially if there’s a family history of breast cancer, it’s advisable not to take progestins. It’s a difficult call that must be made on an individual basis by a physician,” Hyder said. “The next step for this research is finding a type of progestin that does not cause tumor progression but still protects the uterus. Also, we’re trying to see if it’s possible to give patients something in addition to estrogen and progestin that can protect the breast.”

Hyder’s study has been accepted for publication in Menopause: The Journal of The North American Menopause Society. It was co-authored by Hyder ’s colleagues at MU: Yayun Liang, research assistant professor in the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center; Cynthia Besch-Williford, associate professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine; Indira Benakanakere, research scientist; Ryyan Hyder, undergraduate assistant in the Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center; and Mark Ellersieck, research professor in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

Kelsey Jackson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.missouri.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>