Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Delaware Fire Service Offers Important Lessons for Fire Prevention Programs Nationwide

08.11.2011
First public health study to examine a state-level approach to fire safety

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy finds fire and life safety programs in Delaware offer a strategic, comprehensive and coordinated approach to fire prevention.

The study, which involved in-depth interviews with members of the state’s fire service, highlights the diversity of prevention initiatives underway in the state and documents how tradition, dedication, and a sense of community are keys to success for the program. Delaware was chosen for the study because some federal fire officials view the state as a model for fire and life safety practices. The report, published in the November issue of Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, offers recommendations to states and localities across the country looking to improve their fire and life safety activities.

Fire and life safety education encompasses community fire and injury prevention efforts. Examples include smoke alarm distribution initiatives and programs that aim to address recidivism among fire-setting youth. In 2009, residential fires in the U.S. resulted in more than 2,500 civilian deaths, 13,000 injuries and property loss of almost $7.8 billion.

“Close to 90 percent of fire departments in the U.S. conduct fire and life safety programs, yet little is known about the factors that influence their success and sustainability,” said lead study author Shannon Frattaroli, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, part of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “By examining the culture and context of a specific state’s program and sharing what we learn, we hope to help other states improve their own fire and life safety services.”

Using the case study method, the researchers collected data from in-person key informant interviews, direct observation of fire prevention events, and relevant documents such as programmatic materials. Key informants included members of the Delaware Volunteer Firemen’s Association (DVFA), local fire chiefs, and representatives from the State’s Fire Marshal’s Office.

“Of the characteristics that emerged about the Delaware fire service’s approach to prevention, a sense of community was perhaps the strongest theme,” said Andrea Gielen, ScD, a co-author of the study and the director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy. Many of those interviewed reported their involvement with Delaware’s various communities as essential to the effectiveness of their work. “We learned that partnerships with schools, the media and local business are integral to expanding the reach of fire safety and prevention programs throughout the state. This finding is of particular importance given the impact of the nation’s economic woes on fire service budgets.”

The researchers also examined the extent to which Delaware fire service professionals are engaged in policy advocacy efforts, such as hosting legislative appreciation events. “With several promising fire prevention policy initiatives gaining momentum, including efforts to expand residential sprinkler requirements, it’s important to consider how the fire service can work with public health professionals to advance such policy efforts,” stated Frattaroli. “I firmly believe these efforts could benefit from greater coordination between public health and fire service advocates. Public health professionals should consider the steps necessary to advance this approach.”

Additional authors of “Fire Prevention in Delaware: A Case Study of Fire and Life Safety Initiatives” are Jennifer Piver-Renna (Army Institute of Public Health), Keshia Pollack (Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health), and Van M. Ta (San Jose State University).

This research was supported by a grant to the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. The findings and conclusions in this research are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the office views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Media contact, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health : Tim Parsons, director of Public Affairs, at 410-955-7619 or tmparson@jhsph.edu.

Contact for the Center for Injury Research and Policy: Alicia Samuels at 914-720-4635 or alsamuel@jhsph.edu.

Tim Parsons | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhsph.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Fighting drug resistant tuberculosis – InfectoGnostics meets MYCO-NET² partners in Peru

28.04.2017 | Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Wireless power can drive tiny electronic devices in the GI tract

28.04.2017 | Medical Engineering

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's past

28.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

Nose2Brain – Better Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

28.04.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>