Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Corneal thickness linked to early stage Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

10.04.2012
National multi-center study suggests monitoring is necessary for early intervention

A national consortium of researchers has published new findings that could change the standard of practice for those treating Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD), a disease characterized by cornea swelling that can eventually lead to the need for corneal transplantation.

The Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy Genetics Multi-Center Study Group, led by co-principal investigators Jonathan Lass, MD, Charles I Thomas Professor and chair, Case Western Reserve University Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and director, University Hospitals Eye Institute, and Sudha Iyengar, PhD, professor, Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Genetics, and Ophthalmology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, found that changes in the corneal thickness occur in patients at early stages of FECD even before swelling is observed in the clinical setting. Their study is published in the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

This new evidence suggests that FECD patients should have the thickness of their corneas measured annually to monitor progression of the disease. The disease affects the eye's endothelial cells or the back cell layer of the cornea, which maintains the cornea's normal thickness. However, as the disease advances, it was believed at its earlier stages the cornea remained clear and its thickness did not change. This study shows that the cornea in fact experiences a gradual swelling and becomes progressively thicker. Patients typically see an ophthalmologist only when the swelling becomes critical and the surface becomes swollen and the vision blurs. This study suggests ophthalmologists use ultrasonic technology to measure the potential progressive thickening of the cornea to assist in counseling patients on early surgical intervention before scarring develops and interferes with visual recovery.

"It's important if you have the disease, to be checked regularly and have your thickness measured. In the short term, if your vision is decreasing, an ophthalmologist can determine whether it is coming from your cornea or a concurrent cataract and that would assist a surgeon in intervening earlier with either cataract surgery, corneal transplantation, or continuing monitoring of the disease's progression," says Dr. Lass. "In the long term, it might be a way of determining drug intervention based on an individual's gene set, which may be causing the disease."

FECD is the most common reason for corneal transplantation in the United States. The disease usually becomes apparent on examination at its earlier stages in the 40s and 50s with visual impairment developing in the 60s and 70s. In addition, while the disease is more common in women than men and does have some familial heredity, it does occur sporadically. The study group is working to identify the genes that cause the disease.

"These findings have the potential to improve patient care for Fuchs corneal dystrophy, an often painful eye disease that can be difficult to manage," says Hemin Chin, PhD, National Eye Institute, program director for the study. "Clinicians now have an important tool to better monitor the disease and determine when surgical intervention is warranted, particularly for cataracts."

This study was conducted at more than 30 sites across the country and was led by co-PIs Drs. Iyengar and Lass. It was funded by the National Eye Institute, Research to Prevent Blindness, and the Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation.

About Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Founded in 1843, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is the largest medical research institution in Ohio and is among the nation's top medical schools for research funding from the National Institutes of Health. The School of Medicine is recognized throughout the international medical community for outstanding achievements in teaching. The School's innovative and pioneering Western Reserve2 curriculum interweaves four themes--research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism--to prepare students for the practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century. Nine Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the school of medicine.

Annually, the School of Medicine trains more than 800 MD and MD/PhD students and ranks in the top 25 among U.S. research-oriented medical schools as designated by U.S. News & World Report "Guide to Graduate Education."

The School of Medicine's primary affiliate is University Hospitals Case Medical Center and is additionally affiliated with MetroHealth Medical Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic, with which it established the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in 2002.

Jessica Studeny | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.case.edu
http://casemed.case.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>