Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cementless hip implants are durable for at least 20 years

05.05.2009
Despite the common perception that total hip replacements last about 10 years, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found that the devices are extremely durable, even 20 years after surgery.

Clinical and radiological evidence showed that 96 percent of the 124 cementless metal components assessed remained securely fixed in place 20 years post surgery, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

These components, which fit into the cup-shaped hip socket, or acetabulum, were among the first implants designed with a porous structure to allow bone to grow into the surface in the hopes of achieving long-term fixation.

"Our results confirm earlier work done at Rush and at other institutions: that cementless acetabular components work very well and that long-term biological fixation can be obtained," said Dr. Craig Della Valle, an orthopedic surgeon and principal author of the study.

Over the last two decades, the researchers have been studying the results for 204 total hip replacements performed at Rush in the mid-1980s in a group of 184 patients ranging in age from 20 to 84 years. Findings were previously reported at 10 and 15 years.

The implants studied were the Harris-Galante I acetabular component, whose design was based on pioneering research work done by Dr. Jorge Galante, former chairman of orthopedics at Rush and a co-author of this study. Earlier-generation implants, which relied on special cement to secure the device to the patient's bones, had been shown to have higher rates of failure, particularly beyond 10 years.

"The hope was to provide more durable fixation, especially for younger patients with a longer life span," Galante said.

In the present study, the researchers analyzed results for 124 hip replacements in the 111 patients who were still alive 20 years or more after surgery. Since the previous report at 15 years, two metal cup implants, in addition to the three noted earlier, were found to be loose, or 4 percent of the 124 implants. Of the original 204 hip replacements, five cases, or 2.5 percent of the total, had failed. Two of these five implants were revised, but three were left intact because the patients did not suffer significant symptoms.

However, in nearly 20 percent of the patients still living 20 years post surgery, the plastic lining of the metal shell had worn enough that repeat, but less involved, surgery was required or recommended. Younger age strongly correlated with a higher risk of wear-related problems, the study showed.

"The average age of the patients in this study was 52 years, much younger than most patients who underwent hip replacements at the time. So the high rate of wear-related complications was not completely unexpected," Galante said.

Also, with time, the number of surgical revisions has increased due to osteolysis, or bone resorption as a result of the body's reaction to debris created by wear and corrosion of the metal implants.

"With time, the number of repeat surgeries due to wear and osteolysis has increased, as have the numbers of cases of osteolysis we identified radiologically. But with the newer, more wear-resistant bearing surfaces we are now using, we believe that fewer patients today will need revision surgery for these reasons," Della Valle said.

"This longitudinal study gives us a wealth of data to use as we continue to improve on techniques and materials for total hip replacements," Galante said.

Rush University Medical Center's orthopedics program ranks tenth in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. Physicians from Rush serve as the team physicians for the Chicago Bulls and the Chicago White Sox. For more information on orthopedics at Rush, visit http://www.rush.edu/rumc/page-R11726.html or call (888) 352-RUSH.

Rush University Medical Center includes the 674-bed (staffed) hospital; the Johnston R. Bowman Health Center; and Rush University (Rush Medical College, College of Nursing, College of Health Sciences and the Graduate College).

Sharon Butler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rush.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>