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Cancer screening rates comparable for those with and without rheumatoid arthritis

10.07.2012
RA and non-RA patients regularly screened for breast, cervical and colon cancer

New research reveals that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients do not receive fewer cancer screening tests than the general population. Results of the study, funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and published in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), found that RA and non-RA patients receive routine screening for breast, cervical, and colon cancer at similar rates.

The ACR estimates that 1.3 million adult Americans are affected by RA—a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by systemic inflammation of the joints that over time may damage joints, impair daily function, and cause significant disability. Medical evidence confirms that despite early and aggressive treatment, RA patients have a decreased life expectancy compared to the general population. Previous research reports that cancer is one of the main causes of death for RA patients and patients with chronic disease may not receive preventive medical services including regular screenings for cancer.

"Early detection of common cancers can improve morbidity and mortality rates in those with chronic illnesses, such as RA," said Dr. Seoyoung C. Kim with the Division of Rheumatology and Division of Pharmacoepidemiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass. "Cancer screening tests are important in detecting malignancies at early stages for both chronically ill and healthy populations."

To further understand barriers to preventative medical care and raise awareness of the importance of early cancer screenings, Dr. Kim and colleagues examined screening rates for breast, cervical and colon cancer in RA patient compared to those without the disease. Using claims data from a major insurance provider, the team identified 13,314 patients with RA patients and 212,324 non-RA patients.

Analysis shows that on average both RA and non-RA groups were screened once every three years for cervical cancer and every two years for breast cancer. Among all participants 50 years and older, 12% of RA patients and 10% of non-RA patients had at least one colonoscopy each year. Women with RA were more likely to have an annual Pap smear, mammogram, fecal occult blood (FOB) test and colonoscopy than those without RA. Male RA patients were also more likely to have a colonoscopy compared to than those without RA.

"Our findings indicate that RA patients were regularly screened for cervical, breast and colon cancer as recommended by the American Cancer Society," concludes Dr. Kim. "Cancer screenings rates among patients with RA were similar to the general population, which is different than previously published results. However, these earlier studies did not compare rates of cancer screenings in RA patients with a non-RA group." The authors suggest that patients and physicians be aware of the importance of preventive healthcare in patients with chronic diseases such as RA. They caution that results of this should not be generalized to those without medical insurance.

This study is published in Arthritis & Rheumatism. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full Citation: "Cancer Screening Rates in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: No Different than the General Population." Seoyoung C. Kim, Sebastian Schneeweiss, Jessica A. Myers, Jun Liu and Daniel H. Solomon. Arthritis & Rheumatism; Published Online: July 10, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/art.34542).

About the Author: Dr. Seoyoung C. Kim is with the Division of Rheumatology and Division of Pharmacoepidemiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

To arrange an interview with Dr. Kim, please contact her at the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital at +1 617-278-0930 or skim62@partners.org

About the Journal:

Arthritis & Rheumatism is an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP), a division of the College, and covers all aspects of inflammatory disease. The American College of Rheumatology (www.rheumatology.org) is the professional organization who share a dedication to healing, preventing disability, and curing the more than 100 types of arthritis and related disabling and sometimes fatal disorders of the joints, muscles, and bones. Members include practicing physicians, research scientists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, psychologists, and social workers. The journal is published by Wiley on behalf of the ACR. For more information, please visit http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/art .

About Wiley

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace.

Our core businesses publish scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, encyclopedias, books, and online products and services; professional/trade books, subscription products, training materials, and online applications and Web sites; and educational materials for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley's global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company's Web site can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com. The Company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb.

Media Advisory

2012 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting Press Registration Now Open.
What: Press registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the 2012 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting

Where: Walter E. Washington Convention Center; Washington, D.C.

When: November 10 - 14, 2012

Policies: Please make sure to review our press guidelines www.annualmeeting.org/Press as they may impact your ability to receive press credentials

Registration: To register for a press pass, please visit www.annualmeeting.org/Press

Key dates:

Press registration closes: Monday, October 29, 2012
Press conference schedule announced: September
On-site Newsroom opens: Saturday, November 10, 2012
Opening Lecture/Embargo lifts: 4:30 PM Eastern Time on Saturday, November 10, 2012

Contact: Suzanne Forte, sforte@rheumatology.org, 404-633-3777

Headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., the American College of Rheumatology is an international professional medical society that represents more than 8,500 rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals. Rheumatologists are internists or pediatricians who are qualified by training and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bones. Over 50 million Americans - including nearly 300,000 children - suffer from the painful, disabling and sometimes fatal effects of arthritis and rheumatic diseases. The ACR's mission is to advance rheumatology. Learn more by visiting www.rheumatology.org. or follow ACR on Twitter at www.twitter.com/acrheum.

Dawn Peters | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

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