Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bottle-Fed Infants Most at Risk for Bisphenol A Ingestion, But Exposure Levels Well Below “Safe” Limits

10.03.2010
Study reviews more exposure pathways than previous surveys, also concludes additional research needed on production processes for canned soup, canned meat.

Swiss researchers examining exposure pathways for a common chemical used in plastic containers and linings of cans find infants have the highest estimated levels of Bisphenol A (BPA), with exposures falling with rising age. While estimated levels are well below the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) set by European authorities, the findings are important in that BPA is thought to impact human development and is classified as an endocrine disrupting chemical, potentially putting developing infants at risk, as well as fetuses if pregnant mothers are exposed.

The Swiss study examines 17 different sources of potential exposure across nine age/gender groups in the German/Swiss/Austrian population and found the most potentially exposed group is bottle-fed infants from 0-6 months of age. This group had estimated mean dose rates of nearly 0.8 micrograms per kilogram body weight per day, well below the TDI. However “it is of the same order of magnitude as recently reported concentrations that caused low-dose health effects in rodents,” according to the authors.

“In general humans in their developmental stages (fetus, infant, child) seem to be exposed more severely than adults,” wrote author Natalie von Goetz, Ph.D., senior scientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, along with colleagues Matthias Wormuth, Martin Scheringer, and Konrad Hungerbuehler.

... more about:
»BPA »Bisphenol A »EPA pesticide »Risk Analysis »SRA »TDI

The European Union’s TDI for BPA is 50 micrograms per kilogram body weight per day, identical to the risk limit set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced in January they are fast-tracking studies to clarify the research on low-dose effects of BPA exposure.

The study “Bisphenol A: How the Most Relevant Exposure Sources Contribute to Total Consumer Exposure” appears in the March issue of the journal Risk Analysis published by the Society for Risk Analysis.

The researchers detail the relative contributions of the most relevant exposure pathways to arrive at estimates of total consumer exposure, while past studies often focused on single pathways. To date, information on the relative contribution of the different pathways to total consumer exposure is lacking, but is key for managing substance-associated risks. Drawing on studies of how polycarbonate bottles and containers tend to leach more chemicals the more they are heated, the study determines from these and other research the main source of BPA for all consumer groups is food, although some is found in ambient air, drinking water from pipes sealed with epoxy, and as a result of dental surgery, among other sources. For adults, the highest dose comes from canned foods.

The highest uncertainty associated with the assessment lies in assumptions made on the consumption of packaged food. Consequently, the researchers focused on deriving realistic mean intake values from a range of different studies in order to first discriminate the different

BPA sources.

The authors call for more research on finding substitutes for these uses. The findings on dose rates for all consumers were found to closely correspond to global biomonitoring studies that measured BPA in humans, including surveys performed in the United States.

Risk Analysis: An International Journal is published by the nonprofit Society for Risk Analysis (SRA). SRA is a multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, scholarly, international society that provides an open forum for all those who are interested in risk analysis. Risk analysis is broadly defined to include risk assessment, risk characterization, risk communication, risk management, and policy relating to risk, in the context of risks of concern to individuals, to public and private sector organizations, and to society at a local, regional, national, or global level.

Contact: Steve Gibb, 703.610.2441 Steve.Gibb@noblis.org or Lisa Pellegrin, 571.327.4868 or Lisa.Pellegrin@noblis.org to arrange an interview with the author(s). Note to editors: The complete study is available upon request from Lisa Pellegrin/Steve Gibb or here: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123268422/HTMLSTART

Steve Gibb | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.sra.org

Further reports about: BPA Bisphenol A EPA pesticide Risk Analysis SRA TDI

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

nachricht Europe’s Demographic Future. Where the Regions Are Heading after a Decade of Crises
10.08.2017 | Berlin-Institut für Bevölkerung und Entwicklung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>