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Arthritis patients taking newer treatments do not have an overall increased cancer risk

31.05.2011
Separate study shows that the risk of mortality is the same with both
Only three percent (n=181) of patients in the study cohort receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor agents (anti-TNFs) for treatment of their arthritis developed a first cancer within nine years and overall risk was not dependent on the type of arthritis.

The nine year follow-up study conducted at Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark demonstrated that relative risk ((RR)=1.03 (95%confidence interval 0.82-1.30)) was not increased in patients treated with anti-TNFs compared to patients who had never taken anti-TNFs during 23,965 person-years follow-up.

Overall cancer risk was not dependent on the type of arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n=3,496) (RR=1.05, 95% CI 0.82-1.34), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n=670) (RR=1.98, 95% CI 0.24-16.18) or other arthritis (n=499) (RR=0.79 95% CI 0.08-8.33).

"Some studies have suggested that taking anti-TNFs may increase an individual's risk of cancer however this study provides long term evidence that an overall risk of cancer is not associated with this group of treatments", said Dr. PhD, Lene Dreyer from the Department of Rheumatology at Gentofte University Hospital. "TNF is a small signalling molecule called a cytokine and is able to inhibit the development of tumours by interfering with signalling pathways. Therefore drugs targeting TNF can influence the development of tumours, although the extent of this impact remains unclear."

The study was based on the national Danish DANBIO registry which was initiated in the year 2000 to monitor treatment with biologic medicines in Denmark and includes patients with RA, PsA and ankylosing spondylitis. A national cohort of 13,699 patients was identified and of these, 5,598 (41 percent) had started anti-TNF treatment. The data from the DANBIO database was linked with the Danish Cancer Registry and analysed.

Incidence of cancer among patients ever treated with anti-TNF agents was compared to that of patients not treated, by evaluating relative risks. The risk of developing cancer was not shown to increase with time post initiation of anti-TNF therapy (p=0.51), nor with duration of anti-TNF therapy (p=0.19) and it was shown to be independent of the type of anti-TNF agent received (p=0.99). Analysis for the risk of developing specific cancers is still ongoing.

Separate study shows the risk of mortality is the same with both etanercept (Enbrel) and DMARDs (LB0007)

In a further study, data from a large UK observational cohort were analysed to compare mortality rates of 3,431 (71.5%) patients treated with the anti-TNF etanercept and 1,365 (28.5%) treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Results showed that whilst crude mortality rates were lower in the etanercept group at 1.31% versus 2.27%, the difference did not reach statistical significance in the more conservative of the scenarios modelled.

Abstract Number: FRI0203; LB0007

NOTES TO EDITORS: For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please do not hesitate to contact the EULAR congress Press Office in Room N12 (opposite the exhibition hall) of the Congress Centre during EULAR 2011 or on: Email: eularpressoffice@uk.cohnwolfe.com

Rory Berrie:
Onsite tel: +44 7901 513 297
Dimple Natali:
Onsite tel: +44 7900 138 904
About EULAR The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is the organisation which represents the patient, health professional and scientific societies of rheumatology of all the European nations. In line with The European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), EULAR defines rheumatology as including rheumatic diseases of the connective tissue, locomotor and musculoskeletal systems. The aims of EULAR are to stimulate, promote, and support the research, prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of rheumatic diseases. To this end, EULAR fosters excellence in education and research in the field of rheumatology. It promotes the translation of research advances into daily care and fights for the recognition of the needs of people with rheumatic diseases. Diseases of the bone and joints such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis cause disability in 4-5% of the adult population and are predicted to rise as people live longer. EULAR 2011 is set to be the biggest rheumatology event in Europe with over 15,000 scientists, physicians, allied health professionals, and related audiences in attendance from over 100 countries. Over the course of the congress, almost 300 oral and more than 1600 poster abstract presentations will be featured, with 300 invited speaker lectures taking place in more than 140 sessions. To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: www.eular.org

Rory Berrie | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.eular.org

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